Saturday, March 12, 2022

New Issue: European Journal of International Law

The latest issue of the European Journal of International Law (Vol. 32, no. 4, November 2021) is out. Contents include:
  • Editorial
    • EJIL Roll of Honour; 2021 EJIL Peer Reviewer Prize; Changes in the Masthead; Germany v Italy: Jurisdictional Immunities – Redux (and Redux and Redux); 10 Good Reads; Rabia Balkhi – The Legacy of a Medieval Poet in Afghanistan; In This Issue; In This Issue – Reviews
  • Articles
    • Fuad Zarbiyev, On the Judge Centredness of the International Legal Self
    • Katie A. Johnston, The Nature and Context of Rules and the Identification of Customary International Law
    • Jie (Jeanne) Huang, Conflicts and Tentative Solutions to Protecting Personal Data in Investment Arbitration
    • Sherzod Shadikhodjaev, Technological Neutrality and Regulation of Digital Trade: How Far Can We Go?
    • Dafna Dror-Shpoliansky & Yuval Shany, It’s the End of the (Offline) World as We Know It: From Human Rights to Digital Human Rights – A Proposed Typology
  • Roaming Charges
    • Farhat Chira, Poetic Voices from the Past: Rabia Balkhi 4th Hijri Century Poet
  • Legal/Illegal: Use of Force to Recover an Occupied Territory
    • Tom Ruys & Felipe Rodríguez Silvestre, Illegal: The Recourse to Force to Recover Occupied Territory and the Second Nagorno-Karabakh War
    • Dapo Akande & Antonios Tzanakopoulos, Legal: Use of Force in Self-Defence to Recover Occupied Territory
  • Critical Review of Governance
    • Jinyuan Su, Is the Establishment of Air Defence Identification Zones Outside National Airspace in Accordance with International Law?
  • Observations from the 16th Annual Meeting of the European Society of International Law (Stockholm, 2021)
    • Pål Wrange, The 16th Annual Conference of the European Society of International Law: Welcome Remarks
    • Martti Koskenniemi & Sarah M.H. Nouwen, The Politics of Global Lawmaking: A Conversation
    • Sotirios-Ioannis Lekkas, The Hybridity of International Lawmaking: Impressions and Afterthoughts from the ESIL 2021 Stockholm Conference
    • Romain Le Boeuf, Of Doubts and Confusions
  • Symposium: The Restatement (Fourth)
    • Sarah M.H. Nouwen, Christian J. Tams & J.H.H. Weiler, A Transatlantic Symposium on the Restatement (Fourth)
    • Sarah M.H. Nouwen, Paul B. Stephan, Christian J. Tams & J.H.H. Weiler, The Restatement (Fourth): An Interview with One of the Two Co-ordinating Reporters
    • Anne Peters, The American Law Institute’s Restatement of the Law: Bastion, Bridge and Behemoth
    • Hélène Ruiz Fabri, The Limits and the Appeal of the Restatement
    • Paul Stephan, The US Context of the Restatement of the Law (Fourth): The Foreign Relations Law of the United States
    • Alina Miron & Paolo Palchetti, Foreign Relations Law on Treaty Matters from Restatement (Third) to Restatement (Fourth): More a Filter Than a Bridge
    • Curtis A. Bradley & Edward T. Swaine, Restating US Foreign Relations Law: Lessons from the Treaty Materials
    • Cedric Ryngaert, The Restatement and the Law of Jurisdiction: A Commentary
    • William S. Dodge, A Modest Approach to the Customary International Law of Jurisdiction
    • Roger O’Keefe, The Restatement of Foreign Sovereign Immunity: Tutto il Mondo è Paese
    • David P. Stewart & Ingrid B. Wuerth, Sovereign Immunity as Liminal Space
  • Review Essay
    • Jan Petrov, When Should International Courts Intervene? How Populism, Democratic Decay and Crisis of Liberal Internationalism Complicate Things. Review of Shai Dothan, International Judicial Review: When Should International Courts Intervene?
  • Book Reviews
    • Mary Ellen O’Connell, reviewing Chiara Redaelli, Intervention in Civil Wars: Effectiveness, Legitimacy, and Human Rights
    • Ioannis Kampourakis, reviewing Stefano Ponte, Business, Power and Sustainability in a World of Global Value Chains
    • Justin Lindeboom, reviewing Pavlos Eleftheriadis, A Union of Peoples: Europe as a Community of Principle
  • The Last Page
    • Rabia Balkhi (transl. Munazza Ebtikar), In the Elāhi-nāma by Farid al-Din ʿAttār (12th century)

Symposium: EU Autonomy and International Law

On April 8, 2022, the European Society of International Law will host a symposium with the Court of Justice of the European Union on "EU Autonomy and International Law," in Luxembourg. Registration is here. The program is here.

Friday, March 11, 2022

New Issue: Global Society

The latest issue of Global Society (Vol. 36, no. 1, 2022) is out. Contents include:
  • Reconstructing the International Peace Architecture in the Asian Century
    • Yuji Uesugi & Oliver P. Richmond, Reconstructing the International Peace Architecture in the Asian Century
    • Yuji Uesugi & Oliver P. Richmond, The Western International Peace Architecture and the Emergence of the Eastphalian Peace
    • Joanne Wallis, It’s the Little Things: The Role of International Interveners in the Social (re)Construction of the International Peace Architecture
    • Dahlia Simangan, Reflexive Peacebuilding: Lessons from the Anthropocene Discourse
    • Brendan M. Howe, Challenges to and Opportunities for International Organisation in East Asia
    • Kwok Chung Wong, The Rise of China’s Developmental Peace: Can an Economic Approach to Peacebuilding Create Sustainable Peace?

New Issue: Review of International Studies

The latest issue of the Review of International Studies (Vol. 48, no. 2, April 2022) is out. Contents include:
  • Chenchen Zhang, Contested disaster nationalism in the digital age: Emotional registers and geopolitical imaginaries in COVID-19 narratives on Chinese social media
  • August Danielson & Elsa Hedling, Visual diplomacy in virtual summitry: Status signalling during the coronavirus crisis
  • Bohdana Kurylo, Counter-populist performances of (in)security: Feminist resistance in the face of right-wing populism in Poland
  • Daniel Lambach, Space, scale, and global politics: Towards a critical approach to space in international relations
  • Oliver Kearns, Forget what you hear: Careless Talk, espionage and ways of listening in on the British secret state
  • Alessandra Russo & Eva Magdalena Stambøl, The external dimension of the EU's fight against transnational crime: Transferring political rationalities of crime control
  • Evangelos Fanoulis & Weiqing Song, Cooperation between the EU and China: A post-liberal governmentality approach
  • Christian Downie, Competition, cooperation, and adaptation: The organizational ecology of international organizations in global energy governance
  • Christine Agius, ‘This is not who we are’: Gendered bordering practices, ontological insecurity, and lines of continuity under the Trump presidency

New Issue: International Journal of Refugee Law

The latest issue of the International Journal of Refugee Law (Vol. 33, no. 3, October 2021) is out. Contents include:
  • Special Issue on the 70th Anniversary of the 1951 Refugee Convention: Part 2
    • Hugo Storey, The Human Rights Approach to the Refugee Definition: Rising Sun or Falling Star?
    • Camille Lefebvre & Fannie Lafontaine, The Exclusion Clause in Canada: Prioritizing Practical Expediency
    • Esther Pearson, From Voluntary Repatriation to Voluntary Re-Establishment: Cessation of Refugee Status under Article 1C(4) of the Refugee Convention
    • Maja Grundler, ‘Treatment Accorded to Aliens Generally’: Article 7(1) of the 1951 Refugee Convention as a Basis for Visa-Free Access to States Parties’ Territory? An Examination of the Prohibition of Nationality Discrimination in the Refugee Convention

New Issue: Ethics & International Affairs

The latest issue of Ethics & International Affairs (Vol. 36, no. 1, Spring 2022) is out. Contents include:
  • Roundtable: Moral Injury, Trauma, and War
    • Jesse Kirkpatrick & Daniel Rothenberg, Introduction
    • David Wood, The War Is Over but the Moral Pain Continues
    • Daniel Rothenberg, Moral Injury and the Lived Experience of Political Violence
    • Jesse Kirkpatrick, Moral Injury and Revisionist Just War Theory
  • Feature
    • Yuna Han, Should German Courts Prosecute Syrian International Crimes? Revisiting the “Dual Foundation” Thesis
    • Megan Price, The End Days of the Fourth Eelam War: Sri Lanka's Denialist Challenge to the Laws of War
  • >Review Essay
    • Deen Chatterjee, Identity and Shared Humanity: Reflections on Amartya Sen's Memoir

New Issue: International Community Law Review

The latest issue of the International Community Law Review (Vol. 24, nos. 1-2, 2022) is out. Contents include:
  • Special Issue: Corporate Social Responsibility, Human Rights and Sustainable Development: Integrated Perspectives from International Law, EU Law and Contract Law
    • Laura Valle & Stefania Baroncelli, Corporate Social Responsibility, Human Rights and Sustainable Development: Integrated Perspectives from International Law, EU Law and Contract Law
    • Ludovica Chiussi Curzi & Camille Malafosse, A Public International Law Outlook on Business and Human Rights
    • Patrick Simon Perillo, The Role of the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises and the National Contact Points in Shaping the Future of Corporate Accountability
    • Monica Rosini, From CSR to HRDD: An Overview of Approaches, Initiatives and Measures Adopted by the European Union
    • Daniel Augenstein, Stefania Baroncelli, & Orsolya Farkas, Between Private Governance and Public Regulation: Covid-19 and Workers’ Rights in Global Garment Supply Chains
    • Laura Valle & Maria Chiara Marullo, Contract as an Instrument Achieving Sustainability and Corporate Social Responsibility Goals
    • Maria del Sagrario Navarro Lérida & Lorena Sales Pallarés, A True CSR through Codes of Conduct? The Need for a Source-Based Approach to Find Criteria for Accountability for the Activity of Multinationals
    • Stephen J. Turner and Claire Bright, From ‘Due Diligence’ to ‘Adequate Redress’. Towards Compulsory Human Rights and Environmental Insurance for Companies?
    • Michele Cozzio, Public Procurement as a Tool to Promote Sustainable Business Strategies: The Way Forward for the European Union

Thursday, March 10, 2022

Call for Papers: In/Ex-clusiveness through the lens of International Business and Human Rights

The ESIL Interest Group on Business and Human Rights has issued a call for papers for a workshop on "In/Ex-clusiveness through the lens of International Business and Human Rights," to be held as a side-event to the ESIL 2022 Annual Conference, on September 1, 2022. The call is here.

Subedi: The Workings of Human Rights, Law, and Justice: A Journey from Nepal to Nobel Nominee

Surya P. Subedi
(Univ. of Leeds - Law) has published The Workings of Human Rights, Law, and Justice: A Journey from Nepal to Nobel Nominee (Routledge 2022). Here's the abstract:
Drawing on the personal experience of a leading international jurist, this book provides insights into the workings of international law and human rights from a global perspective that transcends the traditional divide between the West and the East, and the Global South and Global North. The work follows the author’s remarkable journey from a simple village in Nepal to becoming an international jurist acclaimed for his innovative academic and influential practical legal work and nomination for the Nobel Peace Prize. It offers insights into the powers bearing on international policymaking, the dynamics of human rights negotiations with governments, and the effects of their outcomes on the lives of their citizens. While much has been written on international human rights law, this inspirational memoir casts a new light on the working of human rights, law, and justice through the eyes of a leading actor. It provides a valuable contribution to the study of justice and human rights and the importance of individual action. As such, the book presents an accessible source for current debates around the development and effectiveness of international law and human rights and practices for decolonising these debates. The book will provide inspiration and practical guidance for students, academics, international lawyers, jurists, and human rights advocates.

New Issue: International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law

The latest issue of the International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law (Vol. 37, no. 1, 2022) is out. Contents include:
  • In Memoriam Professor William Ross Edeson
  • Dawoon Jung & Robert Beckman, Merchant Shipping during Global Health Pandemics: A Review of International Regulations
  • Julia N. Nakamura, Legal Reflections on the Small-Scale Fisheries Guidelines: Building a Global Safety Net for Small-Scale Fisheries
  • Sebastián Preller-Bórquez, Integrating Sustainable Development into the Adoption of Emergency Orders for the Protection of the Common Heritage of Mankind and the Marine Environment
  • Olga Koubrak, David L. VanderZwaag, & Boris Worm, Endangered Blue Whale Survival in the North Atlantic: Lagging Scientific and Governance Responses, Charting Future Courses
  • Mitchell Lennan & Elisa Morgera, The Glasgow Climate Conference (COP26)
  • Pradeep A Singh, What Are the Next Steps for the International Seabed Authority after the Invocation of the ‘Two-year Rule’?
  • David Freestone, Richard Barnes, & Payam Akhavan, Agreement for the Establishment of the Commission of Small Island States on Climate Change and International Law (COSIS)

Forteau & Latty: Communication médiatique de l’Etat et droit international

Mathias Forteau
(Université Paris Nanterre - Law) & Franck Latty (Université Paris Nanterre - Law) have published Communication médiatique de l’Etat et droit international (Pedone 2022). The table of contents is here. Here's the abstract:

La communication médiatique est une composante de plus en plus importante de l’activité diplomatique des Etats. Ce que les spécialistes des relations internationales désignent couramment comme la diplomatie publique a pris ces dernières années un essor remarquable en raison du développement exponentiel des réseaux sociaux, que les Etats ont pleinement intégrés aujourd’hui à leur politique étrangère, y inclus leur politique juridique extérieure. La communication médiatique des Etats interpelle directement de ce fait le droit international. Le présent ouvrage, qui publie les actes du colloque organisé par le CEDIN à l’Université Paris Nanterre le 14 juin 2019, vise à mieux identifier ces relations entre la communication médiatique de l’Etat et le droit international.

Quels sont les enjeux contemporains de la diplomatie numérique ? Quelles sont les limites au droit de l’Etat de communiquer ou de ne pas communiquer ? Comment la communication médiatique de l’Etat sur les questions juridiques internationales s’élabore-t-elle ? Dans quels cas une communication médiatique vaudra-t-elle traité ou acte unilatéral engageant l’Etat, ou participera-t-elle à la formation de la norme coutumière ? En matière de responsabilité internationale, quelle est la portée de la distinction entre communication personnelle et communication officielle ? Une communication médiatique de l’Etat peut-elle constituer une menace de l’emploi de la force ou une incitation à la violence ? Quelle est la place de la communication médiatique dans le champ du règlement des différends internationaux ?

Telles sont, parmi d’autres, les questions auxquelles le présent ouvrage tente d’apporter de manière inédite des éléments de réponse.

Roele: Articulating Security: The United Nations and its Infra-Law

Isobel Roele
(Queen Mary Univ. of London - Law) has published Articulating Security: The United Nations and its Infra-Law (Cambridge Univ. Press 2022). Here's the abstract:
Articulating Security explores the relationship between managerial governance and juridico-political government in the context of the UN’s Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy. The strategy is described as an exercise in compositional articulation of diverse elements and the book shows how managerial technologies of performance review and strategic planning are harnessed to deliver it. The stakes of Articulating Security lie not in the underwhelming achievements of the UN Strategy, but in the disarticulating effects managerial governance has on law. The book draws on Foucault and Freud to analyse the infra-law generated by managerial governance and its reception by international lawyers. Drawing on Kristeva’s concept of abjection, it warns against the redemptive shine comparison with managerialism can give to juridico-political forms of law.

New Volume: African Journal of International Economic Law

The latest volume of the African Journal of International Economic Law (Vol. 2, 2021) is out. Contents include:
  • Olabisi D. Akinkugbe & James T. Gathii, Introduction to Issue 2 of the African Journal of International Economic Law
  • Uchenna Felicia Ugwu, Advancing the Use of Digital Technology by Africa’s Female Farmers: Shortcomings in Data Protection Regulations
  • Karina Patricio Ferreira Lima, Reforming the International Monetary Fund’s Debt Sustainability Assessments towards Achieving the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs): A Crucial Post-Pandemic Recovery Agenda
  • Katrin Kuhlmann, Mapping Inclusive Law and Regulations: A Comparative Agenda for Trade and Development
  • Christopher Changwe Nshimbi, Informality as a Sticky Sector in the Post-Pandemic Era of the Fourth Industrial Revolution
  • Okanga Okanga & Lyla Latif, Effective Taxation in Africa: Confronting Systemic Vulnerability through Inclusive Global Tax Governance
  • Tsotang Tsietsi & Akinyi J. Eurallayah, African Practice in International Economic Law: 2020–2021
  • Oluyori Ehimony & Maryanne Kamau, Panel Report in Morocco – Definitive Anti-Dumping Measures on School Exercise Books from Tunisia (DS578)

New Issue: Transnational Environmental Law

The latest issue of Transnational Environmental Law (Vol. 11, no. 1, March 2022) is out. Contents include:
  • Editorial
    • Thijs Etty, Josephine van Zeben, Cinnamon Carlarne, Leslie-Anne Duvic-Paoli, Bruce Huber, & Anna Huggins, Crossing (Conceptual) Boundaries of Transnational Environmental Law
  • Articles
    • Emille Boulot & Joshua Sterlin, Steps Towards a Legal Ontological Turn: Proposals for Law's Place beyond the Human
    • Niak Sian Koh, Claudia Ituarte-Lima, & Thomas Hahn, Mind the Compliance Gap: How Insights from International Human Rights Mechanisms Can Help to Implement the Convention on Biological Diversity
    • Vincent Bellinkx, Deborah Casalin, Gamze Erdem Türkelli, Werner Scholtz, & Wouter Vandenhole, Addressing Climate Change through International Human Rights Law: From (Extra)Territoriality to Common Concern of Humankind
    • Pauline Martini & Maud Sarliève, Fighting Deforestation in Non-International Armed Conflicts: The Relevance of the Rome Statute for Rosewood Trafficking in Senegal
    • Mingzhe Zhu, The Rule of Climate Policy: How Do Chinese Judges Contribute to Climate Governance without Climate Law?
    • Enrico Partiti, Private Processes and Public Values: Disciplining Trade in Forest and Ecosystem Risk Commodities via Non-Financial Due Diligence
    • Esmeralda Colombo, From Bushfires to Misfires: Climate-related Financial Risk after McVeigh v. Retail Employees Superannuation Trust
  • Case Comment
    • Charlotte E. Blattner & Raffael Fasel, The Swiss Primate Case: How Courts Have Paved the Way for the First Direct Democratic Vote on Animal Rights

ASIL: Proceedings of the 115th Annual Meeting

The Proceedings of the 115th Annual Meeting of the American Society of International Law (2021), edited by Simon Batifort (Curtis, Mallet-Prevost, Colt & Mosle LLP), Christie Edwards (OSCE), & Darin Johnson (Howard Univ. - Law), is now available. The table of contents is here.

de Frouville & Touzé: 70 ans après l’adoption des Conventions de Genève : le droit international humanitaire confronté à de nouveaux défis ?

Olivier de Frouville
& Sébastien Touzé have published 70 ans après l’adoption des Conventions de Genève : le droit international humanitaire confronté à de nouveaux défis ? (Pedone 2022). The table of contents is here. Here's the abstract:
En 2019, le CRDH a saisi l’occasion du 70e anniversaire des Conventions de Genève du 12 août 1949 pour organiser un grand colloque international sur les nouveaux défis du droit international humanitaire (DIH). La fin du XXème siècle et le début du XXIème siècle ont été marqués par des mutations de la conflictualité qui ont profondément affecté les conditions de mise en œuvre du « droit de la guerre » : phénomènes de dé-spatialisation et de dé-temporalisation des conflits ; interventions croissantes de la part de multiples acteurs non-étatiques ; progrès des technologies, avec de nouvelles armes et un nouvel espace de conflit, le cyberespace… Le but du colloque était d’interroger l’ensemble de ces évolutions en mettant en avant les interactions entre les régimes juridiques et les ordres normatifs. Il s’agissait en particulier d’examiner trois problématiques : l’évolution des situations dans lesquelles le droit international humanitaire est amené à s’appliquer et les difficultés qui en découlent, notamment en termes de qualifications et d’applicabilité des corpus normatif ; l’adaptation des normes face aux nouveaux enjeux et aux lacunes ; l’établissement des responsabilités, face à la diversification des acteurs.

Wednesday, March 9, 2022

New Issue: Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Institutions

The latest issue of Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Institutions (Vol. 28, no. 1, January-March 2022) is out. Contents include:
  • Mohammed Ayoob, Taliban Victory Poses No Threat to International Society
  • Thomas G. Weiss & Rorden Wilkinson, The “Missing Middle”: Behind-the-Scenes Global Governance
  • Matthew S. Weinert, Integrating Cultural Heritage into Human Security Analysis: Advancing Human Dignity
  • Shannon Zimmerman, Parallel Lines in the Sand: The Impact of Parallel French Interventions on UN Stabilization Operations in Mali and the Central African Republic
  • Amelie Thürmer & Elena Meyer-Clement, Global City Agency and Multilevel Governance in China
  • Ki-Hyun Bae, Regionalizing Development Cooperation? Examining Intra-ASEAN Regionalism via IAI
  • Stephanie Strobl, Rethinking Institutional Independence: The WHO as a Challenged Institution

New Issue: Journal of the History of International Law / Revue d'histoire du droit international

The latest issue of the Journal of the History of International Law / Revue d'histoire du droit international (Vol. 24, no. 1, 2022) is out. Contents include:
  • Annabel Brett, Use, War, and Commercial Society. Changing Paradigms of Human Relations with Animals in the Early Modern Law of Nature and of Nations
  • Tomasz Kamiński, The Legal Status of Historic Bays in the Light of the Works of the League of Nations Committee of Experts for the Progressive Codification of International Law
  • Sarah Heathcote, Legal Models and Methods of Western Colonisation of the South Pacific
  • Olivier Barsalou, The United States and Human Rights Marginalization at the International Court of Justice, 1945–1950

New Issue: European Journal of International Relations

The latest issue of the European Journal of International Relations (Vol. 28, no. 1, March 2022) is out. Contents include:
  • André Saramago, Post-Eurocentric grand narratives in critical international theory
  • Beverley Loke & Catherine Owen, Mapping practices and spatiality in IR knowledge production: from detachment to emancipation
  • David J. Gordon & Kristin Ljungkvist, Theorizing the globally engaged city in world politics
  • Erik Lin-Greenberg, Reid B.C. Pauly, & Jacquelyn G. Schneider, Wargaming for International Relations research
  • Elisabeth Schweiger, Fighting silence covert warfare and the uphill battle against the unsaid
  • Monika Heupel, Caiden Heaphy, & Janina Heaphy, Seeing reason or seeing costs? The United States, counterterrorism, and the human rights of foreigners
  • Darya Pushkina, Markus B. Siewert, & Stefan Wolff, Mission (im)possible? UN military peacekeeping operations in civil wars
  • Jonathan White, The de-institutionalisation of power beyond the state
  • Johannes Jüde, Making or un-making states: when does war have formative effects?

New Issue: Yale Journal of International Law

The latest issue of the Yale Journal of International Law (Vol. 47, no. 1, Winter 2022) is out. Contents include:
  • Asaf Lubin, The Reasonable Intelligence Agency
  • Ryan M. Scoville, U.S. Foreign Relations Law from the Outside In
  • Paul Harpur & Michael Ashley Stein, The U.N. Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the Global South

New Issue: Virginia Journal of International Law

The latest issue of the Virginia Journal of International Law (Vol. 62, no. 2, Winter 2022) is out. Contents include:
  • Desirée LeClercq, Outsourcing Enforcement
  • Kathleen Claussen, Trade’s Mini-Deals
  • Julian Arato, The Elastic Corporate Form in International Law

New Issue: Human Rights Law Review

The latest issue of the Human Rights Law Review (Vol. 22, no. 2, June 2022) is out. Contents include:
  • Hinako Takata, Reconstructing the Roles of Human Rights Treaty Organs under the ‘Two-Tiered Bounded Deliberative Democracy’ Theory
  • Dalia Palombo, Transnational Business and Human Rights Litigation: An Imperialist Project?
  • Roman Girma Teshome, The Draft Convention on the Right to Development: A New Dawn to the Recognition of the Right to Development as a Human Right?

Tuesday, March 8, 2022

Ollino: Due Diligence Obligations in International Law

Alice Ollino
(Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca) has published Due Diligence Obligations in International Law (Cambridge Univ. Press 2022). Here's the abstract:
Due diligence obligations are typically described by scholars and practitioners as 'elusive', 'weak', and difficult to pin down in the abstract. Challenging these assumptions, this book offers a systematic reconstruction of the foundations of due diligence obligations of states and explores their nature, rationale, content and scope of operation in international law. Tackling due diligence from a general perspective, this book seeks to complement scholarly studies on public international law obligations and their theory. This book will be relevant for academics, practitioners, graduate students across international law and anyone seeking to better conceptualise due diligence under international law and understand how due diligence obligations are operationalised in practice.

New Issue: Journal of International Dispute Settlement

The latest issue of the Journal of International Dispute Settlement (Vol. 13, no. 1, March 2022) is out. Contents include:
  • Articles
    • Juan Carlos Boue, Much More than a Footnote (or Three): Frank C. Hendryx and an Untold Story of Petroleum Concessions and the Genesis of ICSID
    • Thomas D Grant, The ‘Open System’ and Its Gatekeepers: From Complexity in International Law, a Seminar in Honour of James Crawford
    • Ke Song & Xuechan Ma, Individual Opinions as an Agent of International Legal Development?
    • Sandrine de Herdt, Admissibility of Counterclaims: The Practice of UNCLOS Tribunals
    • Massimo Lando, Enhancing Conflict Resolution ‘ASEAN Way’: The Dispute Settlement System of the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership
  • Current Developments
    • Kevin Crow & Lina Lorenzoni-Escobar, From Traction to Treaty-Bound: Jus Cogens, Erga Omnes and Corporate Subjectivity in International Investment Arbitration
    • Patrick Dumberry, State Responsibility for the Conduct of Rebels in Situations of Unsuccessful Civil Wars: A Critical Analysis of the Cengiz v Libya Case

Call for Papers: International Law and Constitution-Making

The Rutgers Center for Transnational Law in partnership with the Diego Portales Public Law Program have issued a call for papers for a symposium on "International Law and Constitution-Making." Here’s the call:

Call for Papers: Symposium on “International Law and Constitution-Making”

The Rutgers Center for Transnational Law (United States) in partnership with the Diego Portales Public Law Program (Chile) have issued a call for papers for a symposium on International Law and Constitution-Making. The symposium is sponsored by the American Society of International Law—Latin America Interest Group and The Chilean Chapter of the International Society of Public Law.

Date & location: Wednesday, May 18, 2022, Rutgers Law School (Camden campus)

Can international law affect constitution-making processes carried out by sovereign states? Should such processes follow international human rights law and international economic law? If so, how? Is sovereignty at risk when states cede to international organizations too much power and influence?

The Rutgers Center for Transnational Law and The Diego Portales School of Law (Chile) will host a symposium that will analyze these and other questions concerning the role of international law in the drafting of new constitutions, with a focus on the constituent process that is currently taking place in Chile—one that scholars around the world follow with great anticipation, as it is the first process in the world which has full gender parity and an enhanced role for indigenous peoples. By convening comparative constitutional scholars and international lawyers, we plan to discuss and reflect on the risks and possibilities that international law poses to countries that use international law in their constituent processes.

Professor Richard Albert from the University of Texas and Professor Mila Versteeg from the University of Virginia School of Law will give keynote addresses.

***

Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words to ctl@law.rutgers.edu or programaderechopublico@mail.udp.cl by April 1st, 2022, with the subject line “Rutgers/UDP Symposium.”

The symposium has secured funding to support a number the travel and accommodation of a number of participants. If you can partially support your travel to Philadelphia, please indicate so in your application.

Selected papers will be published in English in the Rutgers International Law & Human Rights Journal,and in Spanish in the Anuario de Derecho Público, published by the Diego Portales Law School.

Questions? Email jorge.contesse@rutgers.edu or domingo.lovera@udp.cl.

Workshop: What's (in) nationality? Citizenship-by-Investment (CBI) and Beyond

On April 7-8, 2022, the University of Luxembourg and Maastricht University/Globalization & Law Network (GLawNet) will host a workshop (in the hybrid format) on "What's (in) nationality? Citizenship-by-Investment (CBI) and Beyond." Details are here.

Observance of International Women’s Day at the UN Audiovisual Library of International Law

In observance of International Women’s Day, the Codification Division of the UN Office of Legal Affairs has launched a lecture, in English and Spanish, by Cecilia Bailliet on “Women Refugees and Gender Persecution” / “Mujeres Refugiadas y Persecución de Género,” addressing the challenges that affect refugee women and girls.

The Audiovisual Library of International Law is also available as a podcast on SoundCloud and can also be accessed through the relevant preinstalled applications on Apple or Google devices, or through the podcast application of your preference by searching “Audiovisual Library of International Law.”

Monday, March 7, 2022

Call for Papers: Global Law & Politics

The European International Studies Association’s new Standing Section on Global Law & Politics has issued a call for papers for EISA's 15th Annual Conference. Here's the call:

Call for Papers and Panels - EISA 2022 Annual Conference – Section ST21: Global Law & Politics

The European International Studies Association’s (EISA) 15th Annual Conference takes place in Athens from 1-4 September 2022. Submit your proposals to its new Standing Section on Global Law & Politics (ST21). Deadline: 16 March 2022 – submit here.

Section Chairs: Filipe Dos Reis (University of Groningen) and Maj Grasten (Copenhagen Business School)

Law and legal bodies form a key part of the structure of international relations. Yet, legal norms, concepts, jurisdictional boundaries and legal bodies are increasingly contested by various public and private actors globally. This section invites contributions that explore the intersection of law and politics in international relations, including their impact on domestic law and practice. It draws together scholars from different disciplinary fields who share an interest in the role of law in global politics and governance. This includes studies concerned with the history of the relationship between law and politics and particular legal regimes, such as sovereignty and human rights, as well as ways in which transnational, international and global law is practiced and problematized today across diverse institutional fields.

We seek paper and panel proposals on themes including but not limited to:

  • Legal actors, norms and processes in transnational governance and the global political economy, including questions of accountability, legitimacy, authority, and expertise.
  • The history of key legal concepts and regimes in international relations (e.g. sovereignty, human rights, development, international criminal law, and international humanitarian law)
  • The role of global standards, rankings, and indicators in international relations.
  • Regulatory ambiguities and absences in the context of new societal challenges, including the climate, digital economy, and global health.
  • The relationship between law, geopolitics, and the use of force.
  • Interdisciplinary engagements with the relationship between law and politics, bridging International Relations (IR), International Law (IL), International Political Economy (IPE), International Political Sociology (IPS), International Political Theory (IPT), etc.

Please contact the section chairs (f.r.dos.reis@rug.nl and mlg.mpp@cbs.dk) if you have any questions. For more information about the European International Studies Association, please visit its website here.

Conference: Brexit in European and International Legal Perspectives

On March 11, 2022, Bocconi University will host a conference on “Brexit in European and International Legal Perspectives” as a hybrid event. Details are here.

Sunday, March 6, 2022

Job Opening: Post-Doctoral Positions (University Center of Brasilia - CEUB)

The Master/PhD Law and Public Policy Program of the University Center of Brasilia - CEUB has published a call for 2 Post-Doctoral Positions. The advertisement is here. Applications are due before March 15, 2022.

Call for Papers: Connecting social practices to legal outcomes

The ESIL Interest Group on Social Science and International Law has issued a call for papers for a workshop on "Connecting social practices to legal outcomes," to be held as a side-event to the ESIL 2022 Annual Conference, on September 1, 2022. The call is here.

Parella: International Law in the Boardroom

Kish Parella (Washington and Lee Univ. - Law) has posted International Law in the Boardroom (Cornell Law Review, forthcoming). Here's the abstract:

Conventional wisdom predicts that international law must proceed through a “state pathway” before regulating corporations: it binds national governments who then bind corporations through enactment and enforcement of domestic laws and regulations. But recent corporate practices confound this story by presenting two realities difficult to reconcile under this traditional view: The Trump administration withdrew the United States from several international agreements and organizations. But, surprisingly, American corporations complied with these same international laws even when the state pathway broke down. This unexpected compliance leads to three questions: How did corporations comply? Why did they do so? Who enforced international law? These questions are important for two reasons. First, many international laws depend on corporate cooperation in order to succeed. Second, the state pathway is not robust, then or now. It is therefore vital to identify alternatives to the state pathway in order for international laws – on human rights, climate change, labor rights, corruption, and other issues – to reach corporate boardrooms, C-Suites, offices, and supply chains.

This Article synthesizes two traditionally separate fields – public international law and corporate governance – to offer a descriptive account of how corporations incorporate international law into board governance, management decision-making, and contractual relationships. Through original research, it offers three case studies in climate change, human rights, and sustainable development that reveal important incentives and mechanisms for international law compliance that are neglected under the traditional view. It explains that corporations comply in order to manage risks, appease stakeholders, and advance corporate purpose and strategy. Proxy advisors, investors, civil society actors, and even peer corporations enforce international law when a government actor will not. Normatively, these insights enrich academic debates concerning the operation and effectiveness of international law. On a policy level, this Article offers three recommendations for designing international agreements in order to encourage corporate compliance: facilitate comparability, create indicators, and identify corporate purpose compatibility. It applies these lessons to two international agreements in development: (a) treaty on business and human rights, and (b) treaty on pandemic prevention and preparedness.

Call for Papers: International organizations, elites, and masses: perspectives on in/exclusion

The ESIL Interest Group on International Organizations has issued a call for papers for a workshop on "International organizations, elites, and masses: perspectives on in/exclusion," to be held as a side-event to the ESIL 2022 Annual Conference, on September 1, 2022. The call is here.