Friday, May 20, 2022

Conference: International Organizations and the Cold War

On June 2-3, 2022, a conference will be held in Vienna on the topic "International Organizations and the Cold War." Program and registration are here.

Thursday, May 19, 2022

Call for Papers: War and Peace in the 21st Century – The Lifecycle of Modern Armed Conflicts

The Department of International Law at Ludovika – University of Public Service has issued a call for papers for a conference on "War and Peace in the 21st Century – The Lifecycle of Modern Armed Conflicts," to be held September 23, 2022, in Budapest. The call is here.

New Issue: Human Rights Review

The latest issue of the Human Rights Review (Vol. 23, no. 2, June 2022) is out. Contents include:
  • Keziah Colsell & Olivera Simić, ‘It’s Not About the Money—Stop the Trauma’: Victims’ Responses to Reparations in Argentina and Australia
  • Maia Hallward & Jonathan Taylor Downs, Differences in African Indigenous Rights Messaging in International Advocacy Coalitions
  • Bouke de Vries, Should Autists Have Cultural Rights?
  • Mahalia Jackman, Man to Man, Gal to Gal…dat Wrong: an Analysis of How Sexual Prejudice Is Reflected in Jamaican Popular Music
  • Kristina Kironska, Taiwan’s Road to an Asylum Law: Who, When, How, and Why Not Yet?
  • Abdul Halim, Non-Muslims in the Qanun Jinayat and the Choice of Law in Sharia Courts in Aceh
  • Lindsey N. Kingston & Aroline E. Seibert Hanson, Marginalized and Misunderstood: How Anti-Rohingya Language Policies Fuel Genocide

Wednesday, May 18, 2022

Morris: Intellectual Property and the Law of Nations, 1860-1920

P. Sean Morris
(Univ. of Helsinki - Law) has published Intellectual Property and the Law of Nations, 1860-1920 (Brill | Nijhoff 2022). The table of contents is here. Here's the abstract:
What was the state of the law and how states managed to fulfil their international legal obligations under the law of nations with respect to intellectual property protection? 13 contributors show how the transition of intellectual property from private rights holders and their non-state patrons evolves into state lawmaking. The book presents these transitions through international legal perspectives and the history of intellectual property rights in late modern societies in Europe, the United States, Asia and Colonial States in Africa.

Rachovitsa & Johann: The Human Rights Implications of the Use of AI in the Digital Welfare State: Lessons Learned from the Dutch SyRI Case

Adamantia Rachovitsa (Univ. of Groningen - Law) & Niclas Johann (Univ. of Edinburgh - Scottish Research Centre for IP and Technology Law) have posted The Human Rights Implications of the Use of AI in the Digital Welfare State: Lessons Learned from the Dutch SyRI Case (Human Rights Law Review, forthcoming). Here's the abstract:
The article discusses the human rights implications of algorithmic decision-making in the social welfare sphere. It does so against the background of the 2020 Hague’s District Court judgment in a case challenging the Dutch government’s use of System Risk Indication—an algorithm designed to identify potential social welfare fraud. Digital welfare state initiatives are likely to fall short of meeting basic requirements of legality and protecting against arbitrariness. Moreover, the intentional opacity surrounding the implementation of algorithms in the public sector not only hampers the effective exercise of human rights but also undermines proper judicial oversight. The analysis unpacks the relevance and complementarity of three legal/regulatory frameworks governing algorithmic systems: data protection, human rights law and algorithmic accountability. Notwithstanding these frameworks’ invaluable contribution, the discussion casts doubt on whether they are well-suited to address the legal challenges pertaining to the discriminatory effects of the use of algorithmic systems.

Kulick: Provisional Measures after Ukraine v Russia (2022)

Andreas Kulick (Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen - Law) has posted Provisional Measures after Ukraine v Russia (2022) (Journal of International Dispute Settlement, forthcoming). Here's the abstract:
On 16 March 2022, among others measures, the International Court of Justice (ICJ) ordered the Russian Federation to suspend immediately its military operations in Ukraine. The Order is remarkable for several reasons and, so it is submitted, potentially will entail considerable consequences in international adjudication, before and beyond the ICJ, as well as with respect to international law at large. In international procedural law, it emphasizes the vastness of what parties to international proceedings can ask for and what an international court or tribunal can order in respect of provisional measures. However, possibly the strongest potential of the Order does not lie in what it enables, but what it disables: it may deter states that are not a permanent member of the United Nations Security Council from employing insincere human rights arguments as a pretext for a military intervention in a neighbouring state.

Wentker: Partnered Operations and the Positive Duties of Co-Parties

Alexander Wentker (Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law) has posted Partnered Operations and the Positive Duties of Co-Parties (Journal of Conflict & Security Law, forthcoming). Here's the abstract:
A key issue in partnered operations is the extent to which partners have obligations under international law as regards each other’s conduct. For partnered operations in situations of armed conflict, this issue has generated a rich and vivid debate on the existence of a duty to ensure respect for international humanitarian law (IHL) by one’s partners, and in particular, whether this duty would require taking positive action. Rather than weighing in on the general question of whether all States bear such duties, this article sheds light on one aspect that this debate has tended to overlook. The article specifically looks at the situation in which multiple parties are engaged in the same armed conflict alongside one another against a common adversary—here labelled ‘co-parties’. It investigates which positive obligations these parties have as regards each other’s conduct. The central argument is that co-parties in an armed conflict have multiple complementary sets of duties to take positive steps vis-à-vis the conduct of their fellow co-parties. The resulting network of duties reflects the central role of the parties to the conflict to ensure that armed conflicts are carried out in accordance with the protective purposes of IHL. Built into the established structure of the legal framework regulating armed conflict, the account of the duties of co-parties presents a more refined conception to the allocation of obligations under IHL in cooperation settings, which, if implemented, may contribute to addressing the protection challenges raised by partnered operations.

Tuesday, May 17, 2022

New Issue: International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law

The latest issue of the International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law (Vol. 37, no. 2, 2022) is out. Contents include:
  • Neil Craik & Kristine Gu, Strategic Environmental Assessment in Marine Areas beyond National Jurisdiction: Implementing Integration
  • Klaas Willaert, Fair Share: Equitable Distribution of Deep Sea Mining Proceeds
  • Suk Kyoon Kim, An International Law Perspective on the China Coast Guard Law and Its Implications for Maritime Security in East Asia
  • Michael Sheng-ti Gau, The Most Controversial Submission before the CLCS: With Reference to the 2019 Malaysia Submission
  • Arie Afriansyah, Aristyo Rizka Darmawan, & Andreas Pramudianto, Enforcing Law in Undelimited Maritime Areas: Indonesian Border Experience
  • Michael Tsimplis, Governance for Sustainable Development: The Value of Environmental Regulations and the Effect of Maritime Norms

Monday, May 16, 2022

Lecture: Stonebridge on “Hannah Arendt in Kafr-Qasim”

On June 8, 2022, the Annual Lecture of the Centre for Law and Society in a Global Context will be delivered by Lyndsey Stonebridge (Univ. of Birmingham). The topic is: “Hannah Arendt in Kafr-Qasim.” Details, including registration, are here.

Online Event: The European Court of Human Rights between Law and Anthropology

On May 19, 2022, Max Planck Law will host an online conversation between Jessica Greenberg (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign) and Angelika Nußberger (Univ. of Cologne) on "The European Court of Human Rights between Law and Anthropology." Details are here. Register by 5:00pm CEST on May 17, 2022.

Pascale & Tonolo: The Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties: The Role of the Treaty on Treaties in Contemporary International Law

Giuseppe Pascale
(Università degli Studi di Trieste - Law) & Sara Tonolo (Università degli Studi di Trieste - Law) have published The Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties: The Role of the Treaty on Treaties in Contemporary International Law (Edizioni Scientifiche Italiane 2022). The table of contents is here. Here's the abstract:
A multitude of scholarly writings in many languages concern the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties (VCLT). Nevertheless, uncertainties and difficulties can be still identified when trying to understand whether and to what extent the VCLT is still central in international law and if it fits into the current international legal scenario. Such uncertainties and difficulties have resulted in the writing of this book. Hence, the chapters here collected aim at untangling the yarns of some open issues and at filling some gaps in order to ultimately establish whether at present the VCLT continues to have a role in international law. The main perspective is that of public international law. However, some room is reserved to problems stemming from the relationship between the VCLT and EU Law. The VCLT is also observed through the lens of private international law.

von Bernstorff & Mayer: The Historical School and German 19th Century Contributions to International Legal Thought

Jochen von Bernstorff (Univ. of Tuebingen - Law) & Max Mayer (Univ. of Tuebingen) have posted The Historical School and German 19th Century Contributions to International Legal Thought. Here's the abstract:
In the second half of the 19th century, European international law became what Western international lawyers up until the 1930s conceived of as international law. The transformative process during that time led to the establishment of a number of important concepts: the modern notion of the sovereign state as the foundational unit of an international legal order based on common consent; a dualist notion of customary law as an empirical emanation (state practice) of a common legal “consciousness”; post-natural law concepts of a ius ad bellum, sovereign equality, the balance of power, a (constitutive) recognition-doctrine; and the closely connected Eurocentric legal dichotomy of a “civilized” core of Western states and a non-Western periphery. The rise of these concepts was shaped by major political, ideological, jurisprudential and philosophical currents during the long 19th century.The contribution will disentangle some of the most important 19th century doctrinal developments and the associated German jurisprudential theories. In a first step we will describe the reception of the Historical School in international legal scholarship and its doctrinal implications for a modern theory of customary law. As a second step we will reconstruct the contribution of German theories of the sovereign will of the state as the formal basis of international law [Staatswillenspositivismus] leading to new theories of “common consent” and recognition. These two broader developments shaped the last decades of the 19th century and would have long lasting implications for modern international law. Despite the reformist rhetoric of our main scholarly protagonists, both the new historicist foundation of international law in custom and the late 19th century turn to multilateral treaties and common consent were regarded by late 19th century contemporaries as complementing each other. German Staatswillenspositivismus à la Jellinek or Oppenheim developed its theories on “common civilised consent” inside the new historicist foundation of European international provided by the reception of the Historical School in the mid-19th century.

Sunday, May 15, 2022

New Issue: Revue Générale de Droit International Public

The latest issue of the Revue Générale de Droit International Public (Vol. 126, no. 1, 2022) is out. Contents include:
  • Sidy Alpha Ndiaye, Libres propos sur la notion de droits de l’homme en Afrique
  • Stefanos Gakis, Théorie et pratique de la responsabilité de protéger : bilan de 20 ans

Couveinhes Matsumoto & Nollez-Goldbach: La dénonciation des traités – Techniques et politiques

Florian Couveinhes Matsumoto
(Ecole normale supérieure) & Raphaëlle Nollez-Goldbach (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique) have published La dénonciation des traités – Techniques et politiques : Actes de la 5ème journée de droit international de l'ENS (Pedone 2022). The table of contents is here. Here's the abstract:

Depuis 2016-2017, la dénonciation des traités s’est imposée comme un sujet crucial. Si cette question est devenue centrale, c’est en raison de la dénonciation « politique » des Droits international et européens, dont les débouchés « juridiques » les plus évidents ont été le Brexit ainsi qu’une avalanche d’actes de rejet divers de la part de l’administration Trump. Depuis cette période, les manifestations de méfiance à l’endroit des instruments et institutions internationaux et européens se sont multipliées et diversifiées. Cet ouvrage, issu des actes de la 5ème Journée de Droit international de l’ENS en témoigne, mais suggère également l’existence d’un clivage politique entre deux types de rejet du Droit international : certains apparaissent comme une manière, pour des gouvernements à tendance autoritaire ou pour des juridictions nationales « conservatrices », de se soustraire à des institutions internationales elles-mêmes jugées autoritaires, dogmatiques ou biaisées, ou à des règles conventionnelles et surtout dérivées jugées trop intrusives ou trop libérales ; d’autres au contraire consistent ou résultent de critiques populaires, associatives et syndicales de traités excessivement façonnés par des lobbies, contournant l’autorité des parlements et accroissant les inégalités ou la pollution au lieu de faire face sérieusement aux défis écologiques, sociaux et sanitaires actuels.

Dans les deux cas, ces « dénonciations », prises ici au sens large, témoignent d’une fragilisation du lien de confiance unissant les États, en particulier les États occidentaux, et le Droit international. Néanmoins, elles font signe à la fois vers le fond du problème, celui d’un déficit démocratique grandissant des Droits international et européens à l’origine de leur contestation et de difficultés d’exécution, et vers sa solution la plus durablement efficace : une démocratisation globale de ces Droits et avant tout des procédures nationales d’engagement et de désengagement conventionnels.

Bismuth, Rusinova, Starzhenetskiy, & Ulfstein: Sovereign Immunity Under Pressure: Norms, Values and Interests

Régis Bismuth
(Sciences Po), Vera Rusinova (National Research Univ. Higher School of Economics), Vladislav Starzhenetskiy (National Research Univ. Higher School of Economics), & Geir Ulfstein (Univ. of Oslo) have published Sovereign Immunity Under Pressure: Norms, Values and Interests (Springer 2022). The table of contents is here. Here's the abstract:
This book offers a critical analysis of current challenges and developments of the State immunity regime through three dimensions: it looks at State immunity from a comparative perspective; it discusses the major trends relating to the interplay between State immunity and the protection of human rights as well as counter-terrorism; and it examines the relationship between State immunity and the financial obligations of States.

Saturday, May 14, 2022

New Issue: Zeitschrift für ausländisches öffentliches Recht und Völkerrecht

The latest issue of the Zeitschrift für ausländisches öffentliches Recht und Völkerrecht (Vol. 82, no. 1, 2022) is out. Contents include:
  • Comment
    • Achilles Skordas, The Abraham Accords and the Economic Dimension of Peace in the Middle East
  • Nachrufe
    • ichael Bothe & Rainer Hofmann, Professor Dr. Dr. h. c. Rudolf Bernhardt (1925–2021)
    • Jerzy Kranz, Prof. Dr. Dr. h. c. Rudolf Bernhardt (1925–2021)
  • Abhandlungen
    • Frank Schorkopf, Menschenrechte und Mehrheiten
    • Jannika Jahn, Internationaler Klimaschutz mithilfe nationaler Verfas-sungsgerichte? Erkenntnisse aus dem Klimabeschluss des BVerfG
    • Ingo Venzke & Philipp Günther, Völkerrechtlicher Investitionsschutz made in Germany? Zur Genese und Gestalt des ersten BIT zwischen Deutschland und Pakistan (1959)
    • Benedikt Pirker & Jennifer Smolka, Five Shades of Grey – A Linguistic and Pragmatic Approach to Treaty Interpretation
    • Jelena Bäumler & Julieta Sarno, The Immunisation against COVID-19 as a Global Public Good
    • Giuliana Lampo, Jurisdiction Beyond Territorial Sovereignty: Defining the Scope of Exclusive Flag-State Jurisdiction Under Art. 92 UNCLOS
    • Beáta Bakó, Governing Without Being in Power? Controversial Promises for a New Transition to the Rule of Law in Hungary

Kolb, Gaggioli, & Kilibarda: Research Handbook on Human Rights and Humanitarian Law: Further Reflections and Perspectives

Robert Kolb
(Univ. of Geneva - Law), Gloria Gaggioli (Univ. of Geneva - Law), & Pavle Kilibarda, (Univ. of Geneva) have published Research Handbook on Human Rights and Humanitarian Law: Further Reflections and Perspectives (Edward Elgar Publishing 2022). The table of contents is here. Here's the abstract:

Providing up-to-date discussions of both evolving and novel debates in human rights law and humanitarian law, this timely new edition of the Research Handbook on Human Rights and Humanitarian Law complements, rather than replaces, its predecessor with fresh perspectives from leading scholars on the controversial and crucial topics within these fields.

Examining the application of international law to armed conflict situations, contributors present contemporary reflections on a variety of issues that have evolved and emerged in recent years. Chapters integrate a multitude of converging and diverging perspectives on international law in armed conflict, giving voice to stakeholders from academic, humanitarian, judicial, and military backgrounds. Grounded in the results from extensive cutting-edge research on various topics pertaining to the interplay between human rights law and humanitarian law, this Research Handbook illuminates the role of international law in topics such as counterterrorism, tribunals, detention and detainee transfer, sexual and gender-based violence, and torture.

ASIL Prize for Best Article in International Dispute Resolution

The ASIL Dispute Resolution Interest Group has announced a new article prize. Here's the announcement:

New ASIL Prize for Best Article in International Dispute Resolution

During the Annual Meeting of the American Society of International Law (ASIL) held on April 7, 2022 in Washington, D.C., the co-chairs of the ASIL Dispute Resolution Interest Group (DRIG) Simon Batifort and Rémy Gerbay announced the creation of the ASIL DRIG “Prize for Best Article in International Dispute Resolution.” The inaugural 2023 Prize will be awarded to the author(s) of the article published in 2021 that the Selection Committee considers to be outstanding in the field of international dispute resolution. DRIG is currently accepting submissions for the Prize.

Please see below details on the Prize and the members of the 2023 Selection Committee:

  • Eligibility: The Selection Committee will consider publications on inter-State dispute settlement, investor-State dispute settlement, international commercial arbitration, and alternative dispute resolution. Any article, or book chapter from an edited volume, in the English language published during 2021 may be nominated. Sole and jointly authored papers are eligible, and self-nominations are accepted. Membership in the American Society of International Law is not required. Submissions from outside the United States are welcome and encouraged.
  • Criteria: In assessing submissions, the Selection Committee will take into account factors such as: a) depth of research; b) sophistication of analysis; c) originality; d) quality of writing; and e) potential impact on the field of international dispute resolution.
  • Submission: The Dispute Resolution Interest Group is currently accepting submissions, which must be received by October 31, 2022. Electronic submission is required in portable document format (.pdf). All submissions must include contact information (name, e-mail, phone, address). Electronic submissions should be sent to the following email address: drig@asil.org. Please indicate “Submission for the DRIG Prize” in the subject line.
  • Prize: The Selection Committee will select one publication for the award of the Prize. The Prize consists of a certificate of recognition, a complimentary registration for the 2023 ASIL Annual Meeting, a complimentary one-year membership in the Society, and a complimentary one-year subscription to the Jus Mundi international law and arbitration search engine. The winner of the Prize will be announced at the ASIL Annual Meeting in April 2023. The Prize is sponsored by Curtis, Mallet-Prevost, Colt & Mosle LLP, Hughes Hubbard & Reed LLP, and Jus Mundi.
  • Selection Committee: The Selection Committee consists of individuals drawn from private practice, academia, and/or government who possess expertise in the fields covered by the Prize, and also includes the DRIG co-chairs. The Selection Committee for the inaugural 2023 Prize will be presided by Michele Potestà (Lévy Kaufmann Kohler) and will include Crina Baltag (Stockholm University), Kun Fan (UNSW Sidney), James Thuo Gathii (Loyola University Chicago), Norah Gallagher (Queen Mary University of London), Ndanga Kamau (Independent Arbitrator), Facundo Pérez Aznar (Geneva Center for International Dispute Settlement), Dirk Pulkowski (Permanent Court of Arbitration), and Jeremy Sharpe (Independent Arbitrator).

Friday, May 13, 2022

New Issue: Chinese Journal of International Law

The latest issue of the Chinese Journal of International Law (Vol. 21, no. 1, March 2022) is out. Contents include:
  • Articles
    • James A Green, The Rise of Twiplomacy and the Making of Customary International Law on Social Media
    • Lauri Mälksoo, The Legacy of F.F. Martens and the Shadow of Colonialism
    • Juan Francisco Escudero Espinosa, The Principle of Non-Recognition of States Arising from Serious Breaches of Peremptory Norms of International Law
    • Lam Hing-chau & Qin Jing, The Protective Jurisdiction Under the Hong Kong National Security Law: Legitimacy and Impact
    • Tae Jung Park, “Cheap Talk” in International Trade Law
  • Comment
    • Sayeman Bula-Bula, The Judgment of the Appeals Chamber of the International Criminal Court of 5 March 2020 in the Case of Afghanistan
    • Kaijun Pan, Difference Between the ICJ and the CERD Committee: A Comment on the Application of the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (Qatar v. United Arab Emirates) Case

Ishii: Doctrines of the Self-Defence on the High Seas under Law of the Sea

Yurika Ishii (National Defense Academy of Japan) has posted Doctrines of the Self-Defence on the High Seas under Law of the Sea (Journal of Conflict and Security Law, forthcoming). Here's the abstract:
This article assesses the current legal status of the doctrine of self-defence on the high seas in light of its theoretical and historical development. It examines the parameters of the self-defence doctrine when the intervention against a foreign vessel does not violate the Charter of the United Nations (the UN Charter) Article 2(4), and the situation does not trigger Article 51 because there is no armed attack. It traces the development of the doctrines from the mid-19th century to the UN Charter and the First Conference on the United Nations on the Law of the Sea of 1958. It points out that the normative significance of the flag state principle and the grounds of the shipping interception on the high seas were inconsistent. It explores the various basis of maritime interdiction and the scholarly arguments that denied such measures in light of the freedom of the high seas. Then, it examines the codification process of the Convention on the High Seas and Convention on the Territorial Sea and Contiguous Zone. The research shows that the Caroline Test is consistent with the principle of the freedom of the high seas. The development after the UN Charter did not alter this standard both in the context of the measures against vessels supporting domestic insurgents and the anti-terrorism maritime interdiction.

Special Issue: Bias in International Law

The latest issue of the German Law Journal (Vol. 23, no. 3, April 2022) focuses on "Bias in International Law." Contents include:
  • Special Issue: Bias in International Law
    • Veronika Fikfak, Daniel Peat, & Eva van der Zee, Bias in International Law
    • Moshe Hirsch, Regulators’ Mindsets, Ingroup Favoritism, and the National Treatment Obligation in World Trade Organization Law
    • Benedikt Pirker & Izabela Skoczeń, Pragmatic Inferences and Moral Factors in Treaty Interpretation—Applying Experimental Linguistics to International Law
    • Jonathan Kolieb, Consuming International Law: Towards an Experimental Research Agenda for Understanding the Effects of Corporate International Humanitarian Law Violations on Consumer Buying Behavior
    • Runar Hilleren Lie, The Influencers of International Investment Law: A Computational Study of ISDS Actors’ Changing Behavior
    • Evangelia Nissioti, It Takes Three to Tango: A Behavioral Analysis of the Benefits of Having a Mediator in International Disputes
    • Eva van der Zee, How Insights on Bounded Rationality Could Inform the International Law of Environmental Assessments
    • Ezgi Yildiz & Umut Yüksel, Understanding the Limitations of Behavioralism: Lessons from the Field of Maritime Delimitation

New Issue: International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics

The latest issue of International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics (Vol. 22, no. 2, June 2022) is out. Contents include:
  • Special Issue: Lessons Learnt from International Environmental Agreements: Celebrating 20 years of International Environmental Agreements (INEA)
    • Joyeeta Gupta, Courtney Vegelin, & Nicky Pouw, Lessons learnt from international environmental agreements for the Stockholm + 50 Conference: celebrating 20 Years of INEA
    • Agni Kalfagianni & Oran R. Young, The politics of multilateral environmental agreements lessons from 20 years of INEA
    • Peter H. Sand & Jeffrey McGee, Lessons learnt from two decades of international environmental agreements: law
    • Nicky R. M. Pouw, Hans-Peter Weikard, & Richard B. Howarth, Economic analysis of international environmental agreements: lessons learnt 2000–2020
    • Philipp Pattberg, Cille Kaiser, Oscar Widerberg & Johannes Stripple, 20 Years of global climate change governance research: taking stock and moving forward
    • Naho Mirumachi & Margot Hurlbert, Reflecting on twenty years of international agreements concerning water governance: insights and key learning
    • Matilda Petersson & Peter Stoett, Lessons learnt in global biodiversity governance
    • Sylvia Karlsson-Vinkhuyzen, Katharina Rietig, & Michelle Scobie, Agency dynamics of International Environmental Agreements: actors, contexts, and drivers
    • Joshua Philipp Elsässer, Thomas Hickmann, Sikina Jinnah, Sebastian Oberthür, & Thijs Van de Graaf , Institutional interplay in global environmental governance: lessons learned and future research
    • Joyeeta Gupta, Aarti Gupta, & Courtney Vegelin, Equity, justice and the SDGs: lessons learnt from two decades of INEA scholarship

Thursday, May 12, 2022

New Issue: International Criminal Law Review

The latest issue of the International Criminal Law Review (Vol. 22, no. 3, 2022) is out. Contents include:
  • Raphaël van Steenberghe, Who Are Protected by the Fundamental Guarantees under International Humanitarian Law? Part 1: Breaking with the Status Requirement in Light of the ICC Case Law
  • Elena Katselli Proukaki, Preventing the Forcibly Displaced from Returning as Persecution and Inhumane Act under International Criminal Law and the Rome Statute
  • Patryk Gacka, Remote Victimisation and the Proximate Cause. Transgenerational Harms before the International Criminal Court
  • Klea Ramaj, The 2015 South Korean–Japanese Agreement on ‘Comfort Women’: A Critical Analysis
  • Liana Georgieva Minkova, Control over the Theory: Reforming the icc’s Approach to Establishing Commission Liability?
  • Cristina Fernández-Pacheco Estrada, What We Talk About When We Talk About Early Release in International Criminal Law: The Sui Generis Nature of the Reduction of Sentence Under the Rome Statute

Wednesday, May 11, 2022

Workshop: Political Economy, History, & International Law

On June 2-3, 2022, the Graduate Institute will host a workshop, in the hybrid format, on "Political Economy, History, & International Law," in which Susan Marks (London School of Economics - Law) will serve as discussant for the works-in-progress of early career researchers. Program and registration are here.

New Issue: International Affairs

The latest issue of International Affairs (Vol. 98, no. 3, May 2022) is out. Contents include:
  • J Luis Rodriguez & Elizabeth Mendenhall, Nuclear weapon-free zones and the issue of maritime transit in Latin America
  • Clare Wenham, Mark Eccleston-Turner, & Maike Voss, The futility of the pandemic treaty: caught between globalism and statism
  • Yaniv Voller, Rethinking armed groups and order: Syria and the rise of militiatocracies
  • Jason Stearns, Involution and symbiosis: the self-perpetuating conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo
  • Jessica Anania, Transitional justice and the ongoing exclusion of sexual exploitation and abuse by international intervenors
  • Dong Jin Kim & Andrew Ikhyun Kim, Global health diplomacy and North Korea in the COVID-19 era
  • Isabel Bramsen, Transformative diplomacy? Micro-sociological observations from the Philippine peace talks
  • Christian Downie, How do informal international organizations govern? The G20 and orchestration
  • Michael Gentile & Martin Kragh, The 2020 Belarusian presidential election and conspiracy theories in the Russo-Ukrainian conflict
  • Adam B Lerner, Pathological nationalism? The legacy of crowd psychology in international theory
  • Yuka Kobayashi & Josephine King, Myanmar's strategy in the China–Myanmar Economic Corridor: a failure in hedging?
  • Giulio Pugliese, Francesca Ghiretti, & Aurelio Insisa, Italy's embrace of the Belt and Road Initiative: populist foreign policy and political marketing
  • Vincent K L Chang, China's new historical statecraft: reviving the Second World War for national rejuvenation