Saturday, November 26, 2022

Donaldson: Peace, war, law: teaching international law in contexts

Megan Donaldson (Univ. College London - Law) has published Peace, war, law: teaching international law in contexts (International Journal of Law in Context, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 393-402, December 2022). Here's the abstract:
This essay takes up the question of what it is to teach international law ‘in context’, drawing on experiences of teaching undergraduate survey courses in the US and UK, and designing a new LLM module on Histories of International Law. The essay begins with an exploration of teaching as a particular context of its own – one with constraints which might also function as foils for creativity. It then sketches some aspects of what teaching international law ‘in context(s)’ might involve, including the ways in which contexts of different kinds put in question one's theory of law, and vice versa. It turns, finally, to an examination of the promise and limits of interdisciplinarity – particularly recourse to history as a discipline – in illuminating contexts.

Maia, Moreira, & Gurgel: Direito Internacional dos Direitos Humanos e as pessoas em situação de vulnerabilidade

Catherine Maia
, Thiago Oliveira Moreira, & Yara Maria Pereira Gurgel have published Direito Internacional dos Direitos Humanos e as pessoas em situação de vulnerabilidade (Polimatia 2022). The table of contents is here. Here's the abstract:
O livro Direito Internacional dos Direitos Humanos e as pessoas em situação de vulnerabilidade (vol. 3) aborda questões atuais relacionadas com a proteção global e geral dos direitos humanos, a proteção específica dos migrantes, a proteção regional dos direitos humanos, bem como o impacto do direito internacional dos direitos humanos no âmbito doméstico. Trata-se uma obra que conta com 21 artigos científicos, de autoria de discentes da graduação e pós-graduação em Direito da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), além de artigos, entre outros, de professores/pesquisadores do Centro Universitário do Estado do Pará (CESUPA), da Universidade Federal do Maranhão (UFMA), da Universidade Federal da Paraíba (UFPB), da Universidade Estadual de Londrina (UEL), da Universidade Federal de Uberlândia (MG), da Universidade Municipal de São Caetano do Sul (USCS), do Centro Universitário Antônio Eufrásio de Toledo de Presidente Prudente e da Universidade Lusófona do Porto (Portugal).

Scarfi: The Latin American politics of international law: Latin American countries’ engagements with international law and their contradictory impact on the liberal international order

Juan Pablo Scarfi (Univ. of San Andres) has published The Latin American politics of international law: Latin American countries’ engagements with international law and their contradictory impact on the liberal international order (Cambridge Review of International Affairs, vol. 35, no. 5, pp. 662-679, 2022). Here's the abstract:
Recent studies on international law and liberalism have shown convincingly that both liberal internationalism and international law have played a central role in the international politics of Latin America and that Latin American countries have contributed to the consolidation of multilateralism and the Liberal International Order (LIO). Yet, the connections between the institutionalisation of international law and the rise of liberal internationalism in the region have tended to be overlooked. This article examines the genealogy of these connections, focusing on the emergence of two contending legal traditions, a solidarist liberal internationalist tradition and a pluralist and political one. The article argues that the emergence of these opposing legal traditions across the region have had a contradictory impact on the formation of the LIO, contributing to its emergence and consolidation by promoting multilateralism, and to challenging and revising some of its fundamentals when stressing a strong attachment to absolute non-intervention.

New Issue: Global Policy

The latest issue of Global Policy (Vol. 13, no. 5, November 2022) is out. Contents include:
  • Research Articles
    • Richard Higgott & Simon Reich, The age of fuzzy bifurcation: Lessons from the pandemic and the Ukraine War
    • Anju Mary Paul, Jiang Haolie, & Cynthia Chen, If caring begins at home, who cares for the carers? Introducing the Global Care Policy Index
    • David Coen, Julia Kreienkamp, Alexandros Tokhi, & Tom Pegram, Making global public policy work: A survey of international organization effectiveness
    • Melanie van Driel, Frank Biermann, Rakhyun E. Kim, & Marjanneke J. Vijge, International organisations as ‘custodians’ of the sustainable development goals? Fragmentation and coordination in sustainability governance
    • Marianne Beisheim & Felicitas Fritzsche, The UN High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development: An orchestrator, more or less?
    • Laerte Apolinário Júnior & Felipe Jukemura, A comparative analysis of the environmental and social policies of the AIIB and World Bank
    • Andreas Klasen, Roseline Wanjiru, Jenni Henderson, & Josh Phillips, Export finance and the green transition
    • Stephen P. Groff, A contemporary social contract: An exploration of enabling factors influencing climate policy intractability in developed nations
    • Friederike E. L. Otto, Petra Minnerop, Emmanuel Raju, Luke J. Harrington, Rupert F. Stuart-Smith, Emily Boyd, Rachel James, Richard Jones, & Kristian C. Lauta, Causality and the fate of climate litigation: The role of the social superstructure narrative
    • Alfredo Arahuetes García & Gonzalo Gómez Bengoechea, Back to the Future: Lessons from the 2009–2012 austerity policies for the aftermath of the COVID crisis
    • Javier Bilbao-Ubillos & Ana-Isabel Fernández-Sainz, The results of internal devaluation policy as a crisis exit strategy: The case of Spain
    • Matthew Rendall, Nuclear war as a predictable surprise
  • Policy Insights
    • Len Fisher & Anders Sandberg, A Safe Governance Space for Humanity: Necessary Conditions for the Governance of Global Catastrophic Risks
    • Aly Verjee, Ceasefire monitoring under fire: The OSCE, technology, and the 2022 war in Ukraine
    • Michael Lloyd & Chris Dixon, A future multipolar world
  • Response Articles
    • Fred H. Lawson & Matteo Legrenzi, Iran's Taliban problem revisited
    • Benoit Mayer, Attribution science and the fate of climate litigation

Conference: UNCLOS @ 40: The next 40 years

On November 30-December 1, 2022, the Hellenic Branch of the International Law Association will host a conference on "UNCLOS @ 40: The next 40 years," online and at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. The program is here. Registration is here.

New Issue: Journal of Conflict Resolution

The latest issue of the Journal of Conflict Resolution (Vol. 67, no. 1, January 2023) is out. Contents include:
  • Articles
    • Lauren Kahn & Michael C. Horowitz, Who Gets Smart? Explaining How Precision Bombs Proliferate
    • Christoph Valentin Steinert, The Impact of Domestic Surveillance on Political Imprisonment: Evidence from the German Democratic Republic
    • Theodore McLauchlin, State breakdown and Army-Splinter Rebellions
    • Deniz Aksoy, Andrew Menger, & Margit Tavits, The Effect of Curfews on Political Preferences
    • Joseph M. Cox & Rachel D. Van Nostrand, Wielding the Gavel or Balancing the Scales? Domestic Legal Systems and Post-Conflict Justice
  • Data Set Feature
    • Barış Arı, Peace Negotiations in Civil Conflicts: A New Dataset

Conference: Justice for Atrocities: Dialogues and Encounters between Latin-America and Europe

On December 6-7, 2022, Westminster Law School and the University of Jyväskylä will hold a conference on "Justice for Atrocities: Dialogues and Encounters between Latin-America and Europe" online and (in part) in person. Registration and program are here.

New Issue: The Law and Practice of International Courts and Tribunals

The latest issue of The Law and Practice of International Courts and Tribunals (Vol. 21, no. 3, 2022) is out. Contents include:
  • Symposium: International Law without International Courts
    • David Bigge, Rule of Law Without International Courts
    • Philip Burton, Law, Adjudication, and the “Experiment of International Administration” (1920–1946)
    • Eleni Methymaki, Thinking Beyond International Adjudication: Inspections as Instruments of Order Production in the International System
    • Helen Jennings, In the Absence of a Tribunal, Can UN Investigative Mechanisms Ensure Justice for Victims of Rape as a Weapon of War?
  • Articles
    • Anna Ventouratou, Litigating Economic Sanctions
    • Craig Gaver, Recourse to International Courts and Tribunals in the 2017–2021 Gulf Dispute

Call for Papers: Human Rights and Investment Law for Climate Change: Trends and Prospects

The Centre for International Law and Governance of the University of Copenhagen Faculty of Law has issued a call for papers for a conference on "Human Rights and Investment Law for Climate Change: Trends and Prospects," to take place March 20-21, 2023, in Copenhagen. The call is here.

Conference: The Practice of Interpretation in International Law

On December 1-2, 2022, the project "The Rules of Interpretation of Customary International Law" (TRICI-Law) and the Department of Transboundary Legal Studies of the University of Groningen will host a conference on "The Practice of Interpretation in International Law: Unity, Diversity, and Evolution" in The Hague. Program and registration are here.

New Issue: Korean Journal of International and Comparative Law

The latest issue of the Korean Journal of International and Comparative Law (Vol. 10, no. 2, 2022) is out. Contents include:
  • Angela Semee Kim & Seryon Lee, Retracing the Works of KJICL: A Decade’s Journey
  • Jinyul Ju, A Positive International Law Approach to the South Korea–Japan Conflicts: Breaking the Vicious Circle
  • Philomène A. Verlaan, The Interface of Science and Law: Protecting, Preserving and Conserving Biodiversity with the Law of the Sea Convention
  • Buhm-Suk Baek & Hosung Ahn, Korean Judicial Decisions: Major Decisions from the Second Half of 2021 to the First Half of 2022

New Issue: African Journal of International and Comparative Law

The latest issue of the African Journal of International and Comparative Law (Vol. 30, no. 4, November 2022) is out. Contents include:
  • Dennis Ndonga & Emmanuel Laryea, Designing Preferential Rules of Origin for the AfCFTA: Addressing Pre-Existing Challenges at the Regional Level
  • Davinia Gómez-Sánchez, Deconstructing the Dominant Human Rights Grammar: An Alter-Native Narrative based on Indigenous Peoples’ World-Views
  • Newman U. Richards, Administration of Value Added Tax (Goods and Services Tax) and Fiscal Federalism in Nigeria: Lessons from Australia, Canada, the USA, India and Ethiopia
  • P. J. Badenhorst, The Distinction between Real Rights and Personal Rights in the Deeds Registration System of South Africa – Part Two: Pragmatic Distinction between Real Rights and Personal Rights
  • Hafsat Iyabo Sa’Adu & Ahmed Olatunji Isau, Prevention of Income and Profit-Shifting to Tax Haven Countries in Nigeria
  • Victor Oluwasina Ayeni, Implementation of the Decisions and Judgments of African Regional Human Rights Tribunals: Reflections on the Barriers to State Compliance and the Lessons Learnt
  • Wiseman Ubochioma, A Commentary on Shareholder Derivative Litigation under the Companies and Allied Matters Act of Nigeria 2020
  • Tamfuh Y. N. Wilson, The United Nations Declaration of Human Rights 1948: Successes and Challenges

New Issue: Archiv des Völkerrechts

The latest issue of Archiv des Völkerrechts (Vol. 60, no. 3, 2022) is out. Contents include:
  • Essay
    • Jerzy Kranz, Russian aggression in Ukraine: Demons in the War for “Peace” or Crime without Punishment?
  • Abhandlungen
    • Peter Hilpold, Das Neutralitätsrecht Österreichs und der Schweiz im „weiten Feld“ des internationalen Rechts. Aktuelle Entwicklungen im Vergleich
    • Ferdinand Weber & Christian Richter, Das Vorhaben eines allgemeinen Gesellschaftsjahres vor dem Verfassungs-, Völker- und Europarecht
  • Beiträge und Berichte
    • Linus Mührel, Ökozid als fünftes Kernverbrechen im Rom-Statut – Meilenstein oder Gefahr für das Völkerstrafrecht?
    • Stefan Onur Seddig, Neue Technologien gegen den Klimawandel? Aktuelle Fragen der Völkerrechtsmäßigkeit des solaren Geoengineerings

Tuesday, November 22, 2022

New Issue: International Organizations Law Review

The latest issue of the International Organizations Law Review (Vol. 19, no. 2, 2022) is out. Contents include:
  • Niamh Kinchin, ‘With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility’: Implied Obligations and the Responsibility to Protect
  • Lukasz Gruszczynski & Margherita Melillo, The Uneasy Coexistence of Expertise and Politics in the World Health Organization: Learning from the Experience of the Early Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic
  • Helmut Philipp Aust & Prisca Feihle, The WHO Foundation and the Law of International Organizations: Towards Better Funding for Global Health?
  • Gail C. Lythgoe, Distinct Persons; Distinct Territories: Rethinking the Spaces of International Organizations
  • Baine P. Kerr, Binding the International Maritime Organization to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea
  • Nicola Bonucci, Gabrielle Marceau, André-Philippe Ouellet, & Rebecca Walker, IGOs’ Initiatives as a Response to Crises and Unforeseen Needs

Monday, November 21, 2022

Call for Submissions: Most Interesting/Important/Influential Articles/Books of 2022 (Junior Scholars)

As in 2020 and 2021, I am issuing a call for submissions directed to junior scholars only (advanced PhD students and junior academics/practitioners) asking for their views on the most "interesting, important, or influential" article or book published in 2022. I will post on this blog a selection from the submissions received. The deadline is Friday, December 9. Thanks in advance to all who participate. Some rules:
  • One submission per person
  • The submission may recommend both an article and a book, but not more than one article and not more than one book
  • The article/book must pertain to international law, though it need not have been written by a lawyer
  • The article/book must have been published in the year 2022
  • Include the article/book title and an internet link to the publication
  • The article/book may be in any language, but the submission recommending the article/book must be in English
  • Include an explanation for your choice, but not more than two paragraphs per article/book
  • Self-nominations will not be accepted
  • Deadline: December 9, 2022, 5:00pm Eastern Time
  • Not all submissions will be posted on the ILR blog
  • By submitting, you consent to the posting of your submission on the ILR blog, subject to editing
  • Successful submissions will be posted the week of December 12, 2022
  • Include your name, current position, and current affiliation with your submission
  • Submissions should be emailed to jacob.cogan@uc.edu with the subject line: "ILR 2022 Interesting Article/Book Submission"

Christensen: Justice Sites and the Fight against Atrocity Crimes

Mikkel Jarle Christensen (Univ. of Copenhagen - Law) has posted Justice Sites and the Fight against Atrocity Crimes (Law & Social Inquiry, forthcoming). Here's the abstract:
This article develops a new conceptual framework designed to critically study how locality and transversal power relations structure activity and developments in the global field of international criminal justice. The framework is built around the concept of “justice sites,” defined as localities in which organized and social labor—in this case, working with international criminal justice—takes place. The potential effects of social labor performed in specific sites of justice are structured partly by their locality and the resources to which it gives access and partly by their structural position in wider transversal chains of cooperation and competition that cut across different globalized and national fields. In addition to structuring the connections between justice sites, transversal power relations link sites of justice to “practice sites” embedded in other fields in which localized, social labor is not routinely engaged with international criminal justice. Such linkages demonstrate how the framework, developed to study how locality and transversal relations shape the fight against atrocity crimes, can also be used to investigate sites engaged in and across other globalized and national fields of justice, law, governance, and security.

Maia & Harelimana: Réenchanter la justice internationale pénale : perspectives universelles et africaines

Catherine Maia
(Universidade Lusófona do Porto - Law) & Jean-Baptiste Harelimana have published Réenchanter la justice internationale pénale : perspectives universelles et africaines (Les Éditions du Net 2022). The table of contents is here. Here's the abstract:
Créée par le Statut de Rome de 1998, la Cour pénale internationale est une institution permanente ayant compétence pour juger les auteurs des crimes les plus graves affectant l’ensemble de la communauté internationale. Si la mise en place de cette juridiction à vocation universelle suscita de grandes espérances, sa légitimité et son efficacité comme cadre stratégique majeur de lutte contre l’impunité a été régulièrement scrutée et questionnée. Elle a été discréditée pour sa sélectivité, ses lenteurs, son coût et son maigre bilan, et soumise à de vives tensions avec certains hauts responsables politiques, si ce n’est à des sanctions sous l’Administration américaine Trump. Face à l’imprévisibilité de la poursuite sereine de son travail dans certaines situations, face parfois à un déficit de confiance marqué par une coopération problématique des États, la jurisprudence de la Cour pénale internationale a permis peu à peu de poser d’importants jalons, notamment en matière de complémentarité avec la justice nationale, des droits de la défense et des réparations des victimes. À cet égard, le franchissement du cap du vingtième anniversaire de l’entrée en vigueur du Statut de Rome en 2002 - marqué par un besoin de réenchanter la justice pénale internationale - constitue un contexte temporel idoine pour dresser un état des lieux. Cet ouvrage esquisse ainsi les défis et les résiliences de cette institution dans l’aéropage de la justice au niveau universel. Il porte également un regard appuyé sur l’Afrique, centre de gravité de la pratique de la Cour pénale internationale, en invitant à une odyssée au cœur des relations entre ce continent et cette juridiction, qui ont conduit à l’échafaudage d’une future cour régionale et à des expérimentations de justice hybride et transitionnelle.

New Issue: Zeitschrift für ausländisches öffentliches Recht und Völkerrecht

The latest issue of the Zeitschrift für ausländisches öffentliches Recht und Völkerrecht (Vol. 82, no. 3, 2022) is out. Contents include:
  • Comment
    • Dana Schmalz, The Disparate State of Refugee Protection in the European Union
  • Abhandlungen
    • Dana Schmalz, The Disparate State of Refugee Protection in the European Union
    • Charlotte Magnus, „Human Rights With Chinese Characteristics“ – Ein Beitrag Chinas zur Weiter entwicklung inter nationaler Menschenrechte?
    • Theresa Upperton, Thomas Buocz, Magdalena Nemeth, & Iris Eisenberger, Lockdown by Press Conference? COVID-19 and the Rule of Law in New Zealand and Austria
    • Sven Korzilius, Constitutio posterior non derogat pactis prioribus? Chiles völkerrechtliche Verträge im Kontext der Verfassungsablösung
    • Marten Breuer, ‘Principled Resistance’ Meets ‘ultra vires’: New Techniques in Opposing ECtHR Judgments
    • Christian Magaard, Ein ständiger Sitz der Europäischen Union im UN-Sicherheitsrat
  • Rezensionsaufsatz
    • András Jakab, Warum verliert die deutsche Verfassungsrechtswissenschaft an internationalem Einfluss und was kann dagegen getan werden?

Sunday, November 20, 2022

Four Ways to Receive ILR Updates

I've added Mastodon, so there are now four ways to receive ILR updates:

Kleinlein: International Law-Making: Domestic Channels to Express Consent to be Bound

Thomas Kleinlein (Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena - Law) has posted International Law-Making: Domestic Channels to Express Consent to be Bound (in Research Handbook on International Law and Domestic Legal Systems, Helmut Philipp Aust, Heike Krieger, & Felix Lange eds., forthcoming). Here's the abstract:
This chapter undertakes a comparative law tour of the domestic channels to express consent to be bound that underlie international law-making. We first explore the field of comparative domestic treaty law before we map the channels of consent in more detail. We then distinguish between formal representation of the state in treaty-making and substantive treaty powers in order to analyse domestic rules on parliamentary approval of treaties. We learn about the functions of parliamentary consent and about the modes and scope of parliamentary participation and its challenges. We then turn to the consequences of the applicable procedure on the status of treaties in domestic law. We will not miss to take a brief look at domestic channelling systems to express consent to be bound that also encompass the consent of the people (via referenda) and substate entities (in federal states). A final outlook will reflect on how shifts in the international legal order—informalisation and both populist and authoritarian tendencies—will impact on the domestic channels to express consent to be bound that we visited on our tour.