Saturday, May 22, 2021

Glanville: Sharing Responsibility: The History and Future of Protection from Atrocities

Luke Glanville
(Australian National Univ. - International Relations) has published Sharing Responsibility: The History and Future of Protection from Atrocities (Princeton Univ. Pres 2021). Here's the abstract:

The idea that states share a responsibility to shield people everywhere from atrocities is presently under threat. Despite some early twenty-first century successes, including the 2005 United Nations endorsement of the Responsibility to Protect, the project has been placed into jeopardy due to catastrophes in such places as Syria, Myanmar, and Yemen; resurgent nationalism; and growing global antagonism. In Sharing Responsibility, Luke Glanville seeks to diagnose the current crisis in international protection by exploring its long and troubled history. With attention to ethics, law, and politics, he measures what possibilities remain for protecting people wherever they reside from atrocities, despite formidable challenges in the international arena.

With a focus on Western natural law and the European society of states, Glanville shows that the history of the shared responsibility to protect is marked by courageous efforts, as well as troubling ties to Western imperialism, evasion, and abuse. The project of safeguarding vulnerable populations can undoubtedly devolve into blame shifting and hypocrisy, but can also spark effective burden sharing among nations. Glanville considers how states should support this responsibility, whether it can be coherently codified in law, the extent to which states have embraced their responsibilities, and what might lead them to do so more reliably in the future.

Sharing Responsibility wrestles with how countries should care for imperiled people and how the ideal of the responsibility to protect might inspire just behavior in an imperfect and troubled world.

New Issue: Journal of International Criminal Justice

The latest issue of the Journal of International Criminal Justice (Vol. 18, no. 5, December 2020) is out. Contents include:
  • Current Events
    • Janine Natalya Clark, The COVID-19 Pandemic and Ecological Connectivity: Implications for International Criminal Law and Transitional Justice
    • Hirad Abtahi, The International Criminal Court during the COVID-19 Pandemic
    • Christian Ritscher, COVID-19 and International Crimes Trials in Germany
  • Articles
    • Andrew Wolman, Dual Nationality and International Criminal Court Jurisdiction
    • Beatriz E Mayans-Hermida & Barbora Holá, Balancing ‘the International’ and ‘the Domestic’: Sanctions under the ICC Principle of Complementarity
    • Elif Gökşen, Proportionality in Refugee Exclusion: An Underestimated Analysis
  • Cases Before International Courts and Tribunals
    • Parv Kaushik, Judicial Review under Article 15 of the Rome Statute and the ‘Interests of Justice’: Towards a Renewed Understanding
    • Pauline Martini, The International Criminal Court versus the African Criminal Court: A Remodelling of the Principle of Complementarity as a Solution to Potential Conflicts of Jurisdiction between the Courts
  • National Prosecution of International Crimes: Legislation and Cases
    • Supanki Kalanadan, Combating Impunity in Sri Lanka: Searching Beyond the United Nations
    • Kate Clark, Ziada v. Gantz and Eshel: A Frontier Case on the Position of Civilian Victims of War

Slotte & Haskell: Christianity and International Law: An Introduction

Pamela Slotte
(Åbo Akademi Univ.) & John D. Haskell (Univ. of Manchester) have published Christianity and International Law: An Introduction (Cambridge Univ. Press 2021). The table of contents is here. Here's the abstract:
This cross-disciplinary collaboration offers historical and contemporary scholarship exploring the interface of Christianity and international law. Christianity and International Law aims to understand and move past arguments, narratives and tropes that commonly frame law-religion studies in global governance. Readers are introduced to a range of confessional and critical perspectives explicitly engaging a diverse range of methodological and theoretical orientations to rethink how we experience and find ourselves caught within the phenomena of Christianity and international law.

Thursday, May 20, 2021

New Issue: Journal of the History of International Law / Revue d'histoire du droit international

The latest issue of the Journal of the History of International Law / Revue d'histoire du droit international (Vol. 23, no. 2, 2021) is out. Contents include:
  • Spotlight-Interview with Mark Somos
    • Raphael Schäfer & Maren Körsmeier, Spotlight-Interview with Mark Somos
  • Articles
    • Gilad Ben-Nun, How Jewish is International Law?
    • Paulo Emílio Vauthier de Macedo & Brenda Maria Ramos Araújo, A Man against a War: Rui Barbosa and the Struggle against a Thought
    • Guido Acquaviva, Russia as the State Continuing the Legal Personality of the USSR – An Inquiry into State Identity or Succession

Aust & Kleinlein: Encounters between Foreign Relations Law and International Law: Bridges and Boundaries

Helmut Philipp Aust
(Freie Universität Berlin - Law) & Thomas Kleinlein (Friedrich-Schiller-Universität, Jena - Law) have published Encounters between Foreign Relations Law and International Law: Bridges and Boundaries (Cambridge Univ. Press 2021). The table of contents is here. This title is available open access here. Here's the abstract:
Foreign relations law and public international law are two closely related academic fields that tend to speak past each other. As this innovative volume shows, the two are closely interrelated and depend on each other for their mutual construction and identity. A better understanding of this relationship is of vital importance for upholding important constitutional values like democracy, the rule of law and the protection of human rights, while enabling states to engage in meaningful forms of international cooperation. The book takes a close look at the encounters between the two fields and offers perspectives for a constructive engagement between the two. Collectively, the contributions argue that the delimitation between the two fields occurs in a hybrid zone of interaction which requires both bridges and boundaries: bridges for the construction of the relationship between the two fields, and boundaries for preserving key normative expectations of both domestic and international law.

Wednesday, May 19, 2021

Call for Contributions: Feminist Judgments: Re-imagining the International Criminal Court

Louise Chappell (UNSW, Sydney), Rosemary Grey (Univ. of Sydney), and Kcasey McLoughlin (Univ. of Newcastle, Australia) have issued a call for expressions of interest for contributions to a book on the International Criminal Court using a feminist judgments methodology, tentatively titled "Feminist Judgments: Re-imagining the International Criminal Court." The call is here.

Online Discussion: Climate Litigation - Law-Making by Nationals Courts?

On May 31, 2021, the Institute for International Affairs of the University of Hamburg Faculty of Law will host the second of its "Hamburg Summer Talk Series in International Law." The topic is: "Climate Litigation - Law-Making by Nationals Courts?" Details are here.

Call for Papers: (Playing) Constitutional Twister: The Mechanisms of Convergence and Divergence Within Multilevel Legal Orders

A call for papers has been issued for a conference on "(Playing) Constitutional Twister: The Mechanisms of Convergence and Divergence Within Multilevel Legal Orders," which will be held in a hybrid format (online and on-site in Ljubljana) on October 1-2, 2021. The call is here.

Webinar: Socio-economic and environmental foundations for peace: What role for international law?

On June 2, 2021, the Glasgow Centre for International Law and Security will hold a webinar on "Socio-economic and environmental foundations for peace: What role for international law?" Details are here.

Besson: La due diligence en droit international

Samantha Besson
(Collège de France) has published La due diligence en droit international (Brill | Nijhoff 2021). Here's the abstract:
Depuis son entrée dans la jurisprudence arbitrale de la fin du XIXe siècle, la due diligence aura connu un succès croissant en droit international. Sa nature, ses sources et son régime n’en demeurent pas moins indéterminés. En réponse aux objections auxquelles elle est désormais soumise, ce cours dresse un état critique de la pratique de la due diligence en droit international. L’objectif est de déterminer si un principe, standard et/ou une obligation de due diligence existent en droit international général, de dégager ce qui pourrait constituer sa structure normative, son fondement et son régime ; d’établir les conditions, le contenu et les modalités de mise en œuvre de la responsabilité internationale pour négligence ; et, enfin, d’examiner les spécificités de la due diligence dans quelques régimes spéciaux comme le droit international de l’environnement, de la cybersécurité et des droits de l’homme. Plus généralement, le cours explore aussi les raisons du renouveau de la due diligence dans l’histoire récente du droit international, et explique ce que ce renouveau nous révèle de l’état de l’ordre juridique et institutionnel international et de ses possibilités de réforme.

Conference: Asian Society of International Law 8th Biennial Conference

On May 24-28, 2021, the Asian Society of International Law will hold online its 8th Biennial Conference. The theme is: "What place for international law in the Asian future?" Program and registration are here.

Puig: At the Margins of Globalization: Indigenous Peoples and International Economic Law

Sergio Puig
(Univ. of Arizona - Law) has published At the Margins of Globalization: Indigenous Peoples and International Economic Law (Cambridge Univ. Press 2021). Here's the abstract:
Despite the tremendous progress in the development of scientific knowledge, the understanding of the causes of poverty and inequality, and the role of politics and governance in addressing modern challenges, issues such as social inclusion, poverty, marginalization and despair continue to be a reality across the world - and most often impact Indigenous Peoples. At the Margins of Globalization explores how Indigenous Peoples are affected by globalization, and the culture of individual choice without responsibility that it promotes, while addressing what can be done about it. Though international trade and investment agreements are unlikely to go away, the inclusion of Indigenous rights provisions has made a positive difference. This book explains how these provisions operate and how to build from their limited success.

Kirabira: Ongwen at the International Criminal Court

Tonny R. Kirabira (Univ. of Portsmouth) has posted an ASIL Insight on Ongwen at the International Criminal Court.

Tuesday, May 18, 2021

New Issue: Archiv des Völkerrechts

The latest issue of Archiv des Völkerrechts (Vol. 59, no. 1, 2021) is out. Contents include:
  • Abhandlungen
    • Diego Zannoni, The Liability Regime for Private Activities in Outer Space: Is There a Normative Gap?
    • Romy Klimke, Menschenrechtsschutz durch subregionale Integrationsgerichtshöfe in Afrika
    • Julius Buckler, Fortbestehende Fragen der Vorbehaltsproblematik – Am Beispiel des deutschen Vorbehalts zum Europäischen Fürsorgeabkommen -
  • Grotius-Lecture
    • Wim Decock, Max Weber, Monopole und der Geist der europäischen Rechtsgeschichte

Call for Authors: Open Textbook on Public International Law

A call for authors has been issued for an "Open Textbook on Public International Law." Details are here.

Online Discussion: The Occupation of Justice: The Supreme Court of Israel and the Occupied Territories

On May 20, 2021, the Minerva Center for Human Rights at the Faculty of Law of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem will hold an online discussion on the occasion of the publication of The Occupation of Justice: The Supreme Court of Israel and the Occupied Territories (2nd ed., David Kretzmer and Yaël Ronen, Oxford University Press, 2021). Details are here.

Monday, May 17, 2021

Fikfak: Friendly Settlement Before the European Court of Human Rights

Veronika Fikfak (Univ. of Copenhagen - iCourts) has posted Friendly Settlement Before the European Court of Human Rights (International Journal of Constitutional Law, forthcoming). Here's the abstract:
Even though they represent almost 50% of all reported cases before the European Court of Human Rights, settlements of human rights violations escape scholars’ attention. Whilst victims are increasingly expected to resolve their disputes amicably, it is unclear whether applicants will be better off accepting settlement offers rather than proceeding to litigation. The paper charts the practice of friendly settlements before the Court from 1980s to today, mapping a shift in approach from seeking bilateral solutions to the proactive role of the Registry as mediator encouraging states and applicants to settle their cases to relieve the Court of the heavy workload. The study of 10,500 cases reveals how strategies adopted by the Registry – from procedural changes to how and when consent is given to settlement, to the framing of settlement offers and a close relationship with representatives of the respondent state – have favoured the most frequent violators of the Convention and sidelined the interests of the applicant. The analysis uncovers that the imbalance between parties and lack of enforcement are very much present in the ECtHR settlement system and that the active role of the Registry has reinforced, rather than redressed these concerns. The findings expose the dangers of pursuing en masse settlement in the human rights context and raise concerns about achieving long-term justice for victims of human rights violations through other means than adjudication.

Workshop: Being a Law Professor as a Woman: Comparative Experiences

On May 21, 2021, an online workshop will be held on "Being a Law Professor as a Woman: Comparative Experiences." Details are here.

Lecture: Otto on "Rethinking International Law's 'Peace': A queer feminist perspective"

On May 24, 2021, Dianne Otto (Univ. of Melbourne - Law) will deliver a lecture on "Rethinking International Law's 'Peace': A queer feminist perspective" as part of the Essex Public International Law Lecture Series. Details are here.

Webinar: China and the WTO: Why Multilateralism Still Matters

On June 16, 2021, STALS (Sant’Anna Legal Studies) will host a webinar on the book "China and the WTO: Why Multilateralism Still Matters." Details are here.

Workshop: Narratives of International Law

On May 20, 2021, the Maastricht University Study Group for Critical Approaches to International Law will hold an online workshop on "Narratives of International Law." Program and registration are here.

Borlini: Not Such a Retrospective: On the implementation of the International Anti-corruption Obligations in Italy

Leonardo S. Borlini (Bocconi Univ. - Law) has posted Not such a Retrospective: On the Implementation of the International Anti-corruption Obligations in Italy (International Criminal Law Review, forthcoming). Here's the abstract:
The past thirty years have seen unprecedented international initiatives aimed at combatting corrupt practices. The net effect of such initiatives is that today there exists a sort of “hyper-norm” repudiating corruption that transcends national boundaries. Over the same period, Italy has ratified and implemented within its legal system five international anti-corruption treaties, and amended its domestic legislation on different occasions. However, despite considerable efforts, corruption remains a serious challenge in the country. This article examines the main achievements and shortcomings of the implementation of the aforementioned conventions in Italy in light of the outcomes of the monitoring procedures established by the same treaties.

Symposium: International law 'in the palm of our hand': reading between the lines of Brazilian International Law textbooks

A symposium on "International law 'in the palm of our hand': reading between the lines of Brazilian International Law textbooks" was recently published on the ILA Brazil blog International Law Agendas. An English-language introduction can be found here and a pdf compilation of the posts can be found here.

Sunday, May 16, 2021

Seminar: Justice: the political economy of international (criminal) law

On May 26, 2021, the Amsterdam Center for International Law at the University of Amsterdam and Melbourne Law School’s Institute for International Law and the Humanities will hold the third seminar of the Series "Unpacking Transitional Justice: International Law, Memory, and Power." The seminar will be held online and feature Christine Schwöbel-Patel (Warwick) and Hannah Franzki (Bremen) on the topic "Justice: the political economy of international (criminal) law." Details and registration are here.

Webinar: The Protection of Intellectual Property Rights under International Investment Law

On May 27, 2021, there will be a virtual webinar celebrating the launch of "The Protection of Intellectual Property Rights under International Investment Law" by Simon Klopschinski, Christopher S. Gibson, and Henning Grosse Ruse-Khan. Details are here.

Call for Papers: The Impact of New Technologies on Public and Private Powers: National and Supranational Perspectives

Carleton University and the research center CERIDAP of the University of Milan have issued a call for papers for a workshop on "The Impact of New Technologies on Public and Private Powers: National and Supranational Perspectives." The call is here.

Davidson: Everyday Lawmaking in International Human Rights Law: Insights from the Inclusion of Domestic Violence in the Prohibition of Torture

Natalie R. Davidson (Tel Aviv Univ. - Law) has posted Everyday Lawmaking in International Human Rights Law: Insights from the Inclusion of Domestic Violence in the Prohibition of Torture (Law and Social Inquiry, forthcoming). Here's the abstract:
How is international human rights law (IHRL) made “everyday”, outside of treaty negotiations? Leading socio-legal accounts emphasize transnational civil society activism as driver of norm change, but insufficiently consider power dynamics and the legal-institutional environment. This article sheds light on these dimensions of IHRL by reconstructing how domestic violence came to be included in the prohibition of torture in five international and regional human rights institutions. Through process-tracing based on interviews and a vast amount of documentation, the study reveals everyday lawmaking in IHRL as a complex, incremental process in which a wide range of actors negotiate legal outcomes. The political implications of this process are ambiguous, as it enables participation while creating hidden sites of power. In addition to challenging existing models of international norm change, this study offers an in-depth empirical exploration of a key development in the international prohibition of torture, and demonstrates the benefits of process-tracing as a socio-legal methodology.