Friday, April 23, 2021

New Issue: American Journal of International Law

The latest issue of the American Journal of International Law (Vol. 115, no. 2, April 2021) is out. Contents include:
  • Articles
    • Anne van Aaken & Betül Simsek, Rewarding in International Law
    • Stratos Pahis, BITs & Bonds: The International Law and Economics of Sovereign Debt
  • International Decisions
    • Olabisi D. Akinkugbe, Houngue Éric Noudehouenou v. Republic of Benin
    • Kanstantsin Dzehtsiarou, Georgia v. Russia (II)
    • Marko Milanović & Tatjana Papić, Makuchyan and Minasyan v. Azerbaijan and Hungary
    • Cecily Rose, Appeal Relating to the Jurisdiction of the ICAO Council
  • Contemporary Practice of the United States Relating to International Law
    • Kristen Eichensehr, Contemporary Practice of the United States Relating to International Law
  • Recent Books on International Law
    • Doug Cassel, reviewing A History of the UN Human Rights Programme and Secretariat, by Bertrand G. Ramcharan
    • Ronald Bettauer, reviewing Negotiating Civil War: The Politics of International Regime Design, by Henry Lovat
    • Salvatore Caserta, reviewing International Judicial Review: When Should International Courts Intervene?, by Shai Dothan

Metekia: Prosecution of Core Crimes in Ethiopia: Domestic Practice vis-à-vis International Standards

Tadesse Simie Metekia
(Jimma Univ. - Law) has published Prosecution of Core Crimes in Ethiopia: Domestic Practice vis-à-vis International Standards (Brill | Nijhoff 2021). Here's the abstract:
Tadesse Simie Metekia’s Prosecution of Core Crimes in Ethiopia offers an in-depth analysis of core crimes trials in Ethiopia within the broader frame of international criminal law. This book is a result of an unprecedented data collection, a meticulous exploration of relevant national and international norms and case laws, as well as a full engagement with the existing literature on the domestic application of international criminal law. A comparative examination of the actual trials and the manner in which Ethiopia set prosecutions of core crimes in motion, Metekia’s book is a significant achievement in terms of furthering academic knowledge and of contributing to the wider policy debates on international criminal justice and on the role of states in prosecuting atrocities.

New Issue: International Journal of Human Rights

The latest issue of the International Journal of Human Rights (Vol. 25, no. 4, 2021) is out. Contents include:
  • Joseph Tzu-Shuo Liu, Preventive detention of dangerous inmates: a dialogue between human rights and penal regimes
  • Fátima García Elena, The spatial aspect of human rights: a framework for the structural and spatial analysis of human rights practice
  • Lucia M. M. K. Elgerud & Jaymelee J. Kim, Mapping the intangible: forensic human rights documentation in post-conflict Uganda
  • Andrea Chandler, Russia's laws on ‘non-traditional’ relationships as response to global norm diffusion
  • Paul Chaney, Human rights and social welfare pathologies: civil society perspectives on contemporary practice across UK jurisdictions – critical analysis of third cycle UPR data
  • Alina Cherviatsova, Memory as a battlefield: European memorial laws and freedom of speech
  • Nasia Hadjigeorgiou, Conflict resolution in post-violence societies: some guidance for the judiciary
  • Songcai Yang, Ling Han & Yingxi Bi, Child trafficking in the Yunnan and Guangdong provinces of China

Thursday, April 22, 2021

Call for Papers: JIEL-ASIL Junior Faculty Forum for International Economic Law

A call for papers has been issued for the inaugural JIEL-ASIL Junior Faculty Forum for International Economic Law. Here's the call:

JIEL-ASIL Junior Faculty Forum for International Economic Law (IEL-Forum)

The Journal of International Economic Law and the International Economic Law Interest Group of the American Society of International Law are delighted to announce the first annual IEL-Forum for Junior Scholars. The IEL-Forum aims at bringing together early career scholars (including junior faculty, VAPs, PhD candidates, etc.) working in the field of international economic law. The purpose is to allow scholars to present their work before an audience of peers and experts and receive feedback from senior scholars. In addition, at least one piece will receive an offer of publication to appear in the 25th volume of the Journal of International Economic Law—the leading publication in the field.

Rules and Format

We welcome applications from early career scholars teaching in law faculties or other schools such as in economics, political science, history or international relations. The Forum welcomes submissions covering a wide range of international economic law topics – trade, investment, finance, tax, labor, intellectual property, data, and other topics reflective of the broad nature of the field.

At the IEL-Forum, up to six successful applicants will present their work; for each paper, a senior scholar will provide a response followed by general discussion by the entire Forum. The intention is to create a process of sustained exchange and feedback that can help to improve the piece. Interested applicants should submit a brief description of the unpublished/unsubmitted project (up to 800 words) and a CV by June 11, 2021 to IEcLIG@asil.org. Applicants should be prepared to comply with the following schedule:

  • Selection and Notification of the List of Participants by July 16, 2021.
  • Draft Papers (up to 12,500 words) circulated by September 10, 2021.
  • IEL-Forum will be held on or around September 23 & 24, 2021 as a zoom event (this year).
  • JIEL Offer(s) of Publication by November 5, 2021.

Professors Kathleen Claussen, Sergio Puig, and Michael Waibel on behalf of JIEL
Professors Julian Arato, J. Benton Heath, and Maria Panezi on behalf of ASIL’s IEL Interest Group

Aust & Demir-Gürsel: The European Court of Human Rights: Current Challenges in Historical Perspective

Helmut Philipp Aust
(Freie Universität Berlin - Law) & Esra Demir-Gürsel (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin - Law) have published The European Court of Human Rights: Current Challenges in Historical Perspective (Edward Elgar Publishing 2021). The table of contents is here. Here's the abstract:

This insightful book considers how the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) is faced with numerous challenges which emanate from authoritarian and populist tendencies arising across its member states. It argues that it is now time to reassess how the ECHR responds to such challenges to the protection of human rights in the light of its historical origins.

Written by a group of established and emerging experts from diverse backgrounds, this book offers a fresh perspective on the questions and challenges facing the ECHR, bringing together different, and thus far isolated, strands of academic and political debate. Contributions combine historiographical insights with explorations of the current and pressing need for the ECHR to find a role for itself, especially in an environment where there is increased scepticism towards the idea of human rights protection. In particular, the critical conception of the Convention as an ‘alarm bell mechanism’ is examined and assessed in relation to its original goal to prevent authoritarian backsliding.

Wednesday, April 21, 2021

New Issue: Nordic Journal of International Law

The latest issue of the Nordic Journal of International Law (Vol. 90, no. 2, 2021) is out. Contents include:
  • Inger Österdahl, Sweden’s Collective Defence Obligations or this is Not a Collective Defence Pact (or Is It?): Considerations of International and Constitutional Law
  • Georgios Milios, Family Unity and International Protection – EU Regulation and its Compatibility with the ECHR
  • Felix E. Torres, Revisiting the Chorzów Factory Standard of Reparation – Its Relevance in Contemporary International Law and Practice
  • Xinxiang Shi, Diplomatic Immunity Ratione Materiae and Crimes in International Law

Conference: Regionalism in International Law / Le regionalisme dans le droit international

On May 3-4, 2021, an online conference will be held on "Regionalism in International Law / Le regionalisme dans le droit international." The conference is being organized under the auspices of the Faculty of Law of th eUniversity of Oslo, the Institut de recherche en droit international et européen de la Sorbonne of the Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, the Institut für Völkerrecht und Europarecht of the University of Göttingen, the Centre d'Études Internationales et Européennes of the Université de Strasbourg, the Høgskolen i Innlandet, and the Centre Universitaire de Norvège à Paris. Program and access information are here.

Kaiga: Britain and the Intellectual Origins of the League of Nations, 1914–1919

Sakiko Kaiga
(Univ. of Tokyo - Institute of Social Science) has published Britain and the Intellectual Origins of the League of Nations, 1914–1919 (Cambridge Univ. Press 2021). Here's the abstract:
In this innovative account of the origins of the idea of the League of Nations, Sakiko Kaiga casts new light on the pro-League of Nations movement in Britain in the era of the First World War, revealing its unexpected consequences for the development of the first international organisation for peace. Combining international, social, intellectual history and international relations, she challenges two misunderstandings about the role of the movement: that their ideas about a league were utopian and that its peaceful ideal appealed to the war-weary public. Kaiga demonstrates how the original post-war plan consisted of both realistic and idealistic views of international relations, and shows how it evolved and changed in tandem with the war. She provides a comprehensive analysis of the unknown origins of the League of Nations and highlights the transformation of international society and of ideas about war prevention in the twentieth century to the present.

Tuesday, April 20, 2021

Conference: International Law and Distribution: Sustainable Development, Security, and the Governance of Resources

On May 13-14, 2021, the Glasgow Centre for International Law and Security will host online a conference on "International Law and Distribution: Sustainable Development, Security, and the Governance of Resources." The conference is the second in a collaboration between the Law Schools of the Universities of Glasgow and Edinburgh. The program is here. Registration is here.

New Issue: Revista de Direito Internacional

The latest issue of Revista de Direito Internacional (Vol. 17, no. 3, 2020) is out. This is a special issue on "Art Law and Cultural Heritage Law / Direito da Arte e do Patrim." The table of contents is here.

Call for Submissions: New Zealand Yearbook of International Law

The New Zealand Yearbook of International Law has issued a call for submissions for its forthcoming volume 18 (2020). The call is here.

Monday, April 19, 2021

de Guttry, Post, & Venturini: The 1998-2000 Eritrea-Ethiopia War and Its Aftermath in International Legal Perspective - From the 2000 Algiers Agreements to the 2018 Peace Agreement

Andrea de Guttry
(Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa), Harry Post (Université Catholique de Lille), & Gabriella Venturini (Università degli Studi di Milano) have published The 1998-2000 Eritrea-Ethiopia War and Its Aftermath in International Legal Perspective - From the 2000 Algiers Agreements to the 2018 Peace Agreement (Asser Press 2021, 2d ed.). The table of contents is here. Here's the abstract:

This book centres on the war that raged between Eritrea and Ethiopia from 1998 to 2000, a war that caused great loss of life and tremendous devastation. It analyses the war in great detail from an international legal perspective: the nature and the state of the boundary conflict preceding the actual armed conflict, the military actions themselves, the role of the UN peacekeeping mission, the responsibility for the multitude of explosive remnants of the war left behind. Ample attention is paid to the decisions of the Eritrea-Ethiopia Claims Commission and the Eritrea-Ethiopia Boundary Commission.

This study is not limited to the war and the period immediately following it, it also examines its more extended aftermath prolonging the analysis as far as the more recent improvement in the relations between Eritrea and Ethiopia, away from a situation of ‘no war, no peace’ that prevailed after the armed conflict ended. The analysis of the war and its aftermath is not only in terms of international legal issues, it has been placed in a wider than strictly legal perspective.

Event: EU Pact on Migration and Asylum: Conversation with European Commission Vice President Schinas

On April 22, 2021, the British Institute of International and Comparative Law will host online "EU Pact on Migration and Asylum: Conversation with European Commission Vice President Schinas." This event is co-sponsored by the War Crimes Research Group in the Department of War Studies and the Society, Culture and Law Research Theme in the School of Security Studies, King's College London. Detaisl and registration are here.

Call for Papers: Penalization of international crimes in national law

A call for papers has been issued for a conference on "Penalization of international crimes in national law," to take place online on June 14-15, 2021. The call is here. The deadline is May 25, 2021.

Le Floch & Lemey: Le revirement de jurisprudence en droit international

Guillaume Le Floch
(Université Rennes 1) & Marie Lemey (Université Rennes 1) have published Le revirement de jurisprudence en droit international (Pedone 2021). The table of contents is here. Here's the abstract:

Le revirement de jurisprudence cristallise une tension classique du droit entre la nouveauté et la sécurité. D’un côté, il permet au juge d’adapter sa jurisprudence à l’évolution de la société. C’est un élément inhérent à la fonction de juger. Mais, de l’autre côté, en prenant le contrepied de la position qui était jusqu’alors la sienne, le juge porte inéluctablement atteinte au principe de sécurité juridique. Le revirement altère la confiance des justiciables et risque de remettre en cause l’autorité des décisions voire in fine de compromettre leur exécution. Si l’équation est de manière générale fort délicate, elle l’est d’autant plus dans l’ordre juridique international que la justice, en dépit des évolutions les plus récentes, y demeure largement consensuelle.

Le présent ouvrage se propose d’analyser la question du revirement de jurisprudence à travers l’étude de la pratique de plusieurs organes juridictionnels réunis autour de grands ensembles : l’arbitrage (tribunaux interétatiques, CIRDI), les juridictions interétatiques (CIJ, TIDM, ORDOMC), les juridictions des droits de l’homme (CEDH, CIDH), les juridictions d’intégration (CJUE, juridictions d’intégration africaines, juridictions d’intégration latino-américaines), les juridictions pénales internationales (CPI, tribunaux pénaux internationaux ad hoc, tribunaux pénaux internationalisés) et les juridictions administratives internationales.

Les différentes études qui émanent d’universitaires sont complétées par le regard de praticiens dont plusieurs membres des juridictions étudiées.

New Issue: Transnational Dispute Management

The latest issue of Transnational Dispute Management (2021, no. 3) is out. The table of contents is here.

Sunday, April 18, 2021

Book Launch: Lustig's Veiled Power: International Law and the Private Corporation 1886-1981

On April 20, 2021, at 9:00am EST, the New York University School of Law's Institute for International Law and Justice will host a book launch for Doreen Lustig's Veiled Power: International Law and the Private Corporation 1886-1981. Participants will include Benedict Kingsbury, B.S Chimni, Megan Donaldson, Martti Koskenniemi, and Glenda Sluga. Registration is here.

Imseis: The United Nations Plan of Partition for Palestine Revisited: On the Origins of Palestine’s International Legal Subalternity

Ardi Imseis (Queen's Univ., Canada - Law) has posted The United Nations Plan of Partition for Palestine Revisited: On the Origins of Palestine’s International Legal Subalternity (Stanford Journal of International Law, Volume 57, no. 1, p. 1, 2021). Here’s the abstract:
This article critically examines the United Nations (U.N.) commitment to international law by revisiting General Assembly Resolution 181(II) of 29 November 1947 recommending the partition of Mandate Palestine into a Jewish State and an Arab State. The main claim advanced is that Resolution 181(II) was an expression of an international rule by law, rather than an international rule of law, through which law was used, abused or selectively applied with grossly iniquitous results. To this end, it undertakes a critical international legal analysis of Resolution 181(II) with specific reference to the verbatim and summary records of the United Nations Special Committee on Palestine whose report of September 1947 formed the basis of both the Resolution’s text and its underlying rationale. Rather than being governed by the objective application of international law, the Resolution was driven by distinctly European political goals, which privileged support for the European Zionist program in Palestine. The result was to legislate into U.N. law the two-state framework as the legal cornerstone of the Organization’s position on Palestine against the wishes of the country’s indigenous Arab majority. In this sense, Resolution 181(II) can be understood as the opening act of Palestine’s disenfranchisement and contingency in the U.N., a subaltern position which continues to this very day.

Call for Submissions: Goettingen Journal of International Law

The Goettingen Journal of International Law has issued a call for submissions for its volume 12, number 1 (2022). The journal in particular seeks contributions that focus on the global pandemic and its direct and indirect effects, as well as current developments in space law and the law of the sea. Apart of the focus, the journal also welcomes any contributions to the current discourse in international law. The call is here. The deadline is September 1, 2021.

New Issue: Review of European, Comparative & International Environmental Law

The latest issue of the Review of European, Comparative & International Environmental Law (Vol. 30, no. 1, April 2021) is out. Contents include:
  • Rakhyun E. Kim & Louis J. Kotzé, Planetary boundaries at the intersection of Earth system law, science and governance: A state‐of‐the‐art review
  • Patrick Toussaint, Loss and damage and climate litigation: The case for greater interlinkage
  • Delphine Misonne, The emergence of a right to clean air: Transforming European Union law through litigation and citizen science
  • Carlos Soria‐Rodríguez, The international regulation for the protection of the environment in the development of marine renewable energy in the EU
  • Xiaoou Zheng, Empowering indigenous peoples and local communities: A human rights‐based appraisal of the compliance mechanism of the Nagoya Protocol
  • Werner Scholtz, ‘Ethical and humane use’, intrinsic value and the Convention on Biological Diversity: Towards the reconfiguration of sustainable development and use
  • Ming Du, Clearing the fog: Forest Stewardship Council labelling and the World Trade Organization
  • Katharine Heyl, Tobias Döring, Beatrice Garske, Jessica Stubenrauch, & Felix Ekardt, The Common Agricultural Policy beyond 2020: A critical review in light of global environmental goals
  • Meelan Thondoo & Joyeeta Gupta, Health impact assessment legislation in developing countries: A path to sustainable development?
  • Surasak Boonrueang & Colin Reid, Conservation agreements and environmental governance: The role of nongovernmental actors
  • Sandya Nishanthi Gunasekara & Md Saiful Karim, The role of ASEAN and its members in promoting the norm of responsible governance of marine biodiversity of areas beyond national jurisdiction
  • Orla Kelleher, A critical appraisal of Friends of the Irish Environment v Government of Ireland