Wednesday, May 6, 2020

New Issue: European Journal of International Law

The latest issue of the European Journal of International Law (Vol. 30, no. 4, November 2019) is out Contents include:
  • Editorial
    • Celebrating Peer Review: EJIL’s Roll of Honour and Announcement of the first EJIL Peer Review Prize; Brexit – Apportioning the Blame; Once Upon a Time in Catalonia…; 10 Good Reads; In This Issue
  • Afterword: Martti Koskenniemi and His Critics
    • Janne E. Nijman, Grotius’ ‘Rule of Law’ and the Human Sense of Justice: An Afterword to Martti Koskenniemi’s Foreword
    • Francesca Iurlaro, International Legal Histories as Orders: An Afterword to Martti Koskenniemi’s Foreword
    • Benjamin Straumann, The Rule of Law: Sociology or Normative Theory? An Afterword to Martti Koskenniemi’s Foreword
  • Articles
    • Raffaela Kunz, Judging International Judgments Anew? The Human Rights Courts before Domestic Courts
    • Michelle Burgis-Kasthala, Entrepreneurial Justice: Syria, the Commission for International Justice and Accountability and the Renewal of International Criminal Justice
    • Francisco de Abreu Duarte, ‘But the Last Word Is Ours’: The Monopoly of Jurisdiction of the Court of Justice of the European Union in Light of the Investment Court System
  • Roaming Charges: Kaleidoscope
  • Symposium: The Psychology of International Law
    • Anne van Aaken & Tomer Broude, The Psychology of International Law: An Introduction
    • Anne van Aaken, Experimental Insights for International Legal Theory
    • Doron Teichman and Eyal Zamir, Nudge Goes International
    • Anton Strezhnev, Beth A. Simmons & Matthew D. Kim, Rulers or Rules? International Law, Elite Cues and Public Opinion
    • Tomer Broude & Inbar Levy, Outcome Bias and Expertise in Investigations under International Humanitarian Law
    • Moshe Hirsch, Cognitive Sociology, Social Cognition and Coping with Racial Discrimination in International Law
    • Sergio Puig, Debiasing International Economic Law
  • EJIL: Debate!
    • Nicolas Lamp, How Should We Think about the Winners and Losers from Globalization? Three Narratives and Their Implications for the Redesign of International Economic Agreements
    • Bernard Hoekman & Douglas Nelson, How Should We Think about the Winners and Losers from Globalization? A Reply to Nicolas Lamp
  • EJIL: Debate!
    • Wendy Ng, Changing Global Dynamics and International Competition Law: Considering China’s Potential Impact
    • Eleanor Fox, Changing Global Dynamics and International Competition Law: A Reply to Wendy Ng
  • Impressions: Reviving a Tradition
    • Pierre-Marie Dupuy, Michel Virally, L’organisation mondiale
  • Books Reviews
    • Gian Luca Burci, reviewing Benjamin Mason Meier and Lawrence O. Gostin (eds). Human Rights in Global Health: Rights-Based Governance for a Globalizing World/li>
    • Mark A. Drumbl, reviewing Marcos Zunino. Justice Framed: A Genealogy of Transitional Justice
    • Sari Kouvo, reviewing Ratna Kapur. Gender, Alterity and Human Rights: Freedom in a Fishbowl
    • Tania Voon, reviewing Emily Sipiorski. Good Faith in International Investment Arbitration
  • The Last Page
    • Kalypso Nicolaidis, What kind of Brit shall I be?