Thursday, April 29, 2021

New Issue: European Journal of International Law

The latest issue of the European Journal of International Law (Vol. 31, no. 4, November 2020) is out Contents include:
  • Editorial
    • Editorial: Peer Review – Institutional Hypocrisy and Author Ambivalence; EJIL Roll of Honour; 2020 EJIL Peer Reviewer Prize; Letters to the Editors – A Note from EJIL and I•CON; Legal/Illegal; 10 Good Reads; In This Issue; A Bumper Review Section
  • Afterword: The Guiding Principles on Shared Responsibility in International Law and Its Critics
    • B. S. Chimni, The Articles on State Responsibility and the Guiding Principles of Shared Responsibility: A TWAIL Perspective
    • Lorenzo Gasbarri, On the Benefit of Reinventing the Wheel: The Notion of a Single Internationally Wrongful Act
    • Vladyslav Lanovoy, The Guiding Principles on Shared Responsibility in International Law: Too Much or Too Little?
    • Odette Murray, Liability In Solidum in the Law of International Responsibility: A Comment on Guiding Principle 7
    • Federica I. Paddeu, Shared Non-responsibility in International Law? Defences and the Responsibility of Co-perpetrators and Accessories in the Guiding Principles
  • Articles
    • Frédéric Gilles Sourgens, The Precaution Presumption
    • Steven R. Ratner, The Aggravating Duty of Non-Aggravation
    • Yury Rovnov, Appropriate Level of Protection: The Most Misconceived Notion of WTO Law
    • Heidi Nichols Haddad, When Global Becomes Municipal: US Cities Localizing Unratified International Human Rights Law
  • The Theatre of International Law
    • Mickey Zar, Piracy: A Treasure Box of Otherness
  • Roaming Charges: COVID Autumn
  • The European Tradition in International Law: Camilo Barcia Trelles
    • Ignacio de la Rasilla, Camilo Barcia Trelles in and beyond Vitoria's Shadow (1888–1977)
    • Randall Lesaffer, The Cradle of International Law: Camilo Barcia Trelles on Francisco de Vitoria at The Hague (1927)
    • Juan Pablo Scarfi, Camilo Barcia Trelles on the Meaning of the Monroe Doctrine and the Legacy of Vitoria in the Americas
    • José María Beneyto, Camilo Barcia Trelles on Francisco de Vitoria: At the Crossroads of Carl Schmitt’s Grossraum and James Brown Scott’s ‘Modern International Law’
  • Review Essays
    • Cait Storr, ‘The War Rages On’: Expanding Concepts of Decolonization in International Law, reviewing Jochen von Bernstorff and Philipp Dann eds., The Battle for International Law: South-North Perspectives on the Decolonization Era
    • Simon Chesterman, Can International Law Survive a Rising China?, reviewing Congyan Cai, The Rise of China and International Law: Taking Chinese Exceptionalism Seriously
    • Jean d’Aspremont, Belgium and the Fabrication of the International Legal Discipline, reviewing Vincent Genin, Le laboratoire belge du droit international: Une communauté épistémique et internationale de juristes (1869–1914)
  • Impressions
    • Erika de Wet, Twenty-Five-Years of Dugard’s International Law: A Lasting Impression
  • Books Reviews
    • Filippo Fontanelli, reviing Santi Romano, The Legal Order (Ed. Mariano Croce)
    • Sarah C. Dunstan, reviewing Christopher R. Rossi, Whiggish International Law: Elihu Root, the Monroe Doctrine, and International Law in the Americas
    • Catherine O’Rourke, rewiewing Gina Heathcote, Feminist Dialogues on International Law: Successes, Tensions, Futures
    • Anne Peters, reviewing Anna Chadwick, Law and the Political Economy of Hunger
    • Dimitri Van Den Meerssche, reviewing Rebecca Schmidt, Regulatory Integration Across Borders: Public–Private Cooperation in Transnational Regulation
    • Fuad Zarbiyev, Rose Parfitt, The Process of International Legal Reproduction: Inequality, Historiography, Resistance
    • Mavluda Sattorova, reviewing Jérémie Gilbert, Natural Resources and Human Rights: An Appraisal
    • David Schneiderman, reviewing Markus Krajewski and Rhea Tamara Hoffman eds., Research Handbook on Foreign Direct Investment
    • Jean Ho, reviewing Aikaterini Florou, Contractual Renegotiations and International Investment Arbitration: A Relational Contract Theory Interpretation of Investment Treaties
    • Esmé Shirlow, reviewing Martin Jarrett, Contributory Fault and Investor Misconduct in Investment Arbitration
    • Christine Schwöbel-Patel, reviewing Maria Elander, Figuring Victims in International Criminal Justice: The Case of the Khmer Rouge Tribunal
    • Henry Lovat, reviewing Kamari Maxine Clarke, Affective Justice: The International Criminal Court and the Pan-Africanist Pushback
  • The Last Page
    • Emily Dickinson, We Grow Accustomed to the Dark