Thursday, November 26, 2020

Saravanan & Subramanian: Role of Domestic Courts in the Settlement of Investor-State Disputes: The Indian Scenario

A. Saravanan
(Indian Institute of Management Indore) & S.R. Subramanian (Indian Institute of Technology) have published Role of Domestic Courts in the Settlement of Investor-State Disputes: The Indian Scenario (Springer 2020). Here's the abstract:

This book addresses the interactions between the domestic courts and the international investment arbitral tribunals, one of the most pressing issues confronting both domestic legal systems and the international legal system. It deals with the core issues inherent in the above interactions, especially with regard to countries outside the ICSID system. It contrasts this narrative with the position under classical international investment law, where national courts are assigned a very specific and minimalistic role in the process of investment disputes settlement. For this purpose, the book chooses India, which follows the non-ICSID model, as the major point of focus and considers both domestic judicial decisions and investment arbitral decisions for critical analysis. The ICSID Convention grants limited powers to domestic courts to issue provisional measures and to enforce ICSID awards.

As the central theme of the book lies at the intersection of domestic law and international law, the work is indispensable for any scholar working in the areas of general international law, international investment law, international economic law, law and economics, international dispute settlement, or international law in domestic courts, as well as domestic judges and international arbitrators. Further, as the subject matter has great implications for both domestic and global governance, it will benefit civil servants, opinion leaders, policy planners and subject experts in economics, the political economy and regional studies, to name a few.

Symposium: Exploring the Frontiers of International Law in Cyberspace

On December 4, 2020, the European Society of International Law, the Jagiellonian University Chair of Public International Law, and the Grotius Centre for International Legal Studies will hold an online symposium on "Exploring the Frontiers of International Law in Cyberspace." Program and registration information are here.

Gathii: The Performance of Africa's International Courts: Using Litigation for Political, Legal, and Social Change

James Thuo Gathii
(Loyola Univ. Chicago - Law) has published The Performance of Africa's International Courts: Using Litigation for Political, Legal, and Social Change (Oxford Univ. Press 2020). The table of contents is here. Here's the abstract:

The performance of international courts has traditionally been judged against criteria of compliance and effectiveness. Whilst these are clearly desirable objectives for litigants before Africa's international courts, this book shows that we must look beyond these criteria to fully appreciate the impact of these courts. This book shows how litigants use their participation in international litigation to achieve other objectives: to amplify political disputes with their governments, to build their movement, to educate the public about their cause, and to challenge the status quo.

Chapters in this collection show how these courts act as coordination points for opposition political parties to name and shame dominant parties for violation of their organizational rights. Others demonstrate how Africa's international courts serve as transitional justice mechanisms in which truth telling about ongoing conflict and authoritarian governance receives significant attention. This attention serves as a platform to galvanize resistance against continued authoritarian rule, especially from outside the conflict countries. Ultimately, the book shows that these courts must be judged against new and broader criteria, and understood as increasingly important venues for waging political, social, environmental, and legal struggles.

Wednesday, November 25, 2020

Hilpold: European International Law Traditions

Peter Hilpold
(Universität Innsbruck - Law) has published European International Law Traditions (Springer 2020). The table of contents is here. Here's the abstract:
International Law is usually considered, at least initially, to be a unitary legal order that is not subject to different national approaches. Ex definition it should be an order that transcends the national, and one that merges national perspectives into a higher understanding of law. It gains broad recognition precisely because it gives expression to a common consensus transcending national positions. The reality, however, is quite different. Individual countries’ approaches to International Law, and the meanings attached to different concepts, often diverge considerably. The result is a lack of comprehension that can ultimately lead to outright conflicts. In this book, several renowned international lawyers engage in an enquiry directed at sorting out how different European nations have contributed to the development of International Law, and how various national approaches to International Law differ. In doing so, their goal is to promote a better understanding of theory and practice in International Law.

Ostřanský & Pérez-Aznar: Investment Treaties and National Governance in India: Rearrangements, Empowerment, and Discipline

Josef Ostřanský (European Univ. Institute) & Facundo Pérez-Aznar (Geneva Center for International Dispute Settlement) have posted Investment Treaties and National Governance in India: Rearrangements, Empowerment, and Discipline (Leiden Journal of International Law, forthcoming). Here's the abstract:
This paper presents selected findings on India relating to the effects of international investment agreements (IIAs) on national governance. Our research used ethnography-inspired methods to explore the often-voiced hypothesis that IIAs induce good governance reforms in their state parties. Our findings demonstrate that the good governance hypothesis is too sweeping and lacks subtlety, but they also bring forward new conceptualisations of the impact of the international investment regime on national governance. Our research shows that governance actors use IIAs selectively in order to advance various agendas and interests. The Indian case study shows that rather than acting like a monolith when reacting to the experience of IIAs, the state is instead a site of struggle between different actors with different motivations, agendas and interests. In such context, IIAs produce various formal-institutional as well as ideological-discursive effects that have not been captured by the existing literature. First, IIAs lead to the simultaneous practices of internalisation through external adjustment and internalisation through accommodation. At the same time, these modes of internalisation lead to rearrangements by internalisation within the public administration. Second, governance actors resort to various narratives about IIAs, which we present in this paper. Importantly, the deployments of various narratives about IIAs are context-dependent and are used by governance actors tactically as convenient tools in internal political struggles within the public administration. These findings have important consequences for the design and reform of international investment regulation, should such regulation have ambition, as it does, to promote good governance.

V.P. de Oliveira & Hourani: Access to Justice in Arbitration: Concept, Context and Practice

Leonardo V.P. de Oliveira
(Royal Holloway, Univ. of London) & Sara Hourani (Middlesex Univ. London) have published Access to Justice in Arbitration: Concept, Context and Practice (Wolters Kluwer 2020). The table of contents is here. Here's the abstract:
Access to Justice in Arbitration is a compendium of essays by arbitral practitioners, academics, and arbitral institution officials presenting, for the first time, an in-depth analysis of the role access to justice plays in arbitration. The exponential growth of arbitration beyond commercial and investment matters, reaching disputes that have traditionally been decided by courts – such as labour and employment, sports, and competition disputes, and those involving human rights violations – raises questions about the impact of this expansion on access to justice. On the whole, this pioneering book assesses how access to justice can be guaranteed in arbitration and, in particular, shows how access to justice works in various types of arbitration.

New Issue: Climate Law

The latest issue of Climate Law (Vol. 10, nos. 3-4, 2020) is out. Contents include:
  • Joshua D. Sarnoff, Negative-Emission Technologies and Patent Rights after COVID-19
  • Gareth Davies, Climate Change and Reversed Intergenerational Equity: the Problem of Costs Now, for Benefits Later
  • Daria Shapovalova, Arctic Petroleum and the 2°C Goal: a Case for Accountability for Fossil-Fuel Supply
  • Chrysa Alexandraki, MRV of Emissions and Mitigation Action: the Paris Agreement and Financial Support for Transparency-Related Capacity Building in Developing Countries

New Issue: European Convention on Human Rights Law Review

The latest issue of the European Convention on Human Rights Law Review (Vol. 1, no. 2, 2020) is out. Contents include:
  • Vassilis P Tzevelekos & Kanstantsin Dzehtsiarou, Normal as Usual? Human Rights in Times of covid-19
  • Wolfgang Benedek, Are the Tools of the Council of Europe Sufficient to Protect Human Rights, Democracy and the Rule of Law from Backsliding?
  • Ineta Ziemele, Liberal Values, Covid-19 and the Judiciary
  • Mikael Rask Madsen & Robert Spano, Authority and Legitimacy of the European Court of Human Rights: Interview with Robert Spano, President of the European Court of Human Rights
  • Conall Mallory, A Traffic-Light System of State Arguments before the European Court of Human Rights
  • Janneke Gerards, Abstract and Concrete Reasonableness Review by the European Court of Human Rights
  • Elif Erken, The Participation of Non-Governmental Organisations and National Human Rights Institutions in the Execution of Judgments of the Strasbourg Court: Exploring Rule 9 Communications at the Committee of Ministers

New Issue: Virginia Journal of International Law

The latest issue of the Virginia Journal of International Law (Vol. 61, no. 1, Fall 2020) is out. Contents include:
  • Articles
    • Cosette D. Creamer & Neha Jain, Separate Judicial Speech
    • Caroline Davidson, Aging Out: Elderly Defendants and International Crimes
  • Essay
    • Mary Kabir-Seraj Bischoping, The Rise of the Nonstate Actor: The New Face of the Bilateral Investment Treaty in the Middle East

Tuesday, November 24, 2020

New Issue: Journal of World Intellectual Property

The latest issue of the Journal of World Intellectual Property (Vol. 23, nos. 5-6, November 2020) is out. Contents include:
  • Tim Wilsdon, Artes Haderi, Zlatina Dobreva, & Giuliano Ricciardi, The economic impact of changing the environment for innovation in Argentina—Applying the lessons of Asia to Latin America
  • William Van Caenegem & Kana Nakano, Standard trade marks, geographical indications and provenance branding in Australia: What we can learn from King Island
  • S. O'Sullivan, Michael Friebe, W. R. Tonti, Margaret Hartnett, Manuel Castro, M. I. Pozzo, & Y. Nilsiam, Surveyed impact of intellectual property training in STEM education on innovation, research, and development
  • Julian Cockbain & Sigrid Sterckx, Quis custodet custodes? Referral G‐3/19 before the EPO Enlarged Board of Appeal and the imperative of challenging the board's interpretation of Art. 53(b) EPC
  • Chan‐Yuan Wong & Mergen Elbegsaikhan, Geographical indications in development contexts: Function, supply chain and pursuit of rural industrial development
  • Ivan Stepanov, Economic development dimension of intellectual property as investment in international investment law
  • Aleksei Gudkov, Robot on the shoulders of humans
  • Luminița Olteanu, Rebranding strategies and their boomerang effect—The curious case of Burberry
  • Mengna Liang, Copyright issues related to reproduction rights arising from streaming
  • Maria Mercedes Frabboni, Fashion designs and brands: The role of the informed user and the average consumer

Monteiro de Matos: Indigenous Land Rights in the Inter-American System: Substantive and Procedural Law

Mariana Monteiro de Matos
(Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology) has published Indigenous Land Rights in the Inter-American System: Substantive and Procedural Law (Brill | Nijhoff 2021). Here's the abstract:
Rights to their traditional lands and resources are essential to the survival of indigenous peoples. They have been formulated and advanced in the most progressive way by the Inter-American system of human rights protection. In this book, Mariana Monteiro de Matos analyzes, in detailed and comprehensive inquiry, the pertinent jurisprudence of the Inter-American Commission and Court of Human Rights. She identifies three distinct waves of decision regarding the objects of ownership or possession, the rights associated, and the holders of the rights. Originally, the book also offers a profound analysis of corollary procedural law.

New Additions to the UN Audiovisual Library of International Law

The Codification Division of the UN Office of Legal Affairs recently added new materials to the UN Audiovisual Library of International Law website. They include a lecture given by Steven Hill on “Legal Aspects of the Work of NATO”; a lecture by Donald M. McRae on “Varieties of International Dispute Settlement: From Litigation to Conciliation”; a lecture by Manuel Rama Montaldo on “Aspectos conceptuales e históricos del proceso de codificación y de desarrollo progresivo del derecho internacional en la Naciones Unidas, con especial referencia a la labor de la Comisión de Derecho Internacional”; and an introductory note by Hans Corell on Agreement between the United Nations and the Royal Government of Cambodia concerning the prosecution under Cambodian law of crimes committed during the period of Democratic Kampuchea, 2003.

Monday, November 23, 2020

Call for Applications: Research Associate - Nuclear Law and Policy (NUS Centre for International Law)

The Centre for International Law at the National University of Singapore invites applications for the position of Research Associate (Nuclear Law and Policy). The call is here.

Call for Applications: Post-Doctoral Fellowship (NUS Centre for International Law)

The Centre for International Law at the National University of Singapore invites applications for a Post-Doctoral Fellowship position with a focus on international economic law, commencing in January 2021. The call is here.

Amoroso: Autonomous Weapons Systems and International Law

Daniele Amoroso
(Università degli Studi di Cagliari - Law) has published Autonomous Weapons Systems and International Law: A Study on Human-Machine Interactions in Ethically and Legally Sensitive Domains (Nomos 2020). Here's the abstract:
Recent advances in robotics and AI have paved the way to robots autonomously performing a wide variety of tasks in ethically and legally sensitive domains. Among them, a prominent place is occupied by robots endowed with the ability to deliver destructive force without human intervention, a.k.a. Autonomous Weapons Systems (or AWS), whose legality under international law is currently at the center of a heated academic and diplomatic debate. The AWS debate provides a uniquely representative sample of the (potentially) disruptive impact of new technologies on norms and principles of international law, in that it touches on key questions of international humanitarian law, international human rights law, international criminal law, and State responsibility. Against this backdrop, this book’s primary aim is to explore the international legal implications of autonomy in weapons systems, by inquiring what existing international law has to say in this respect, to what extent the persisting validity of its principles and categories is challenged, and what could be a way forward for future international regulation on the matter. From a broader perspective, the research carried out on the issue of the legality of AWS under international law aspires to offer some more general insights on the normative aspects of the shared control relationship between human decision-makers and artificial agents.

Call for Papers: Cambridge International Law Journal 2021 Conference

The Cambridge International Law Journal has issued a call for papers for its 10th Annual Conference, which will be held online on March 18-20, 2021. The theme is: "National Sovereignty and International Co‑operation: The Challenges of Navigating Global Crises." The call is here.

New Volume: Italian Yearbook of International Law

The latest volume of the Italian Yearbook of International Law (Vol. 29, 2019) is out. Contents include:
  • Symposium: Challenges to Multilateralism in International Trade Law
    • Giorgio Sacerdoti, Multilateralism and the WTO in the Post Covid-19 World
    • Tommaso Soave, Who Controls WTO Dispute Settlement? Socio-Professional Practices and the Crisis of the Appellate Body
    • Elisa Baroncini, Preserving the Appellate Stage in the WTO Dispute Settlement Mechanism: The EU and the Multi-Party Interim Appeal Arbitration Arrangement
    • Regis Yann Simo, The African Continental Free Trade Area in a Stagnating Multilateral Trading System: On the Likely (Ir)relevance of the Enabling Clause
    • Antonino Alì, National Security and Trade Wars: Legal Implications for Multilateralism
  • Articles
    • Deborah Russo, The Attribution to States of the Conduct of Public Enterprises in the Fields of Investment and Human Rights Law
    • Catherine Costaggiu, The Evolution of BITs: Toward Reconciling Foreign Investment Protection and Socio-Economic Human Rights
    • Carlo De Stefano, From Arbitrators to Judges? Reflections on the Reform of Investor-State Dispute Settlement
  • Notes and Comments
    • Silvia Borelli & Maria Chiara Vitucci, The Italian Response to Exploitation of Migrant Workers in the Agricultural Sector: Between Criminalization and Prevention
    • Natalino Ronzitti, The Agreement Between Italy and Niger on Defence Cooperation
    • Maria Rosaria Mauro, “National Security”, Foreign Investments and National Screening Procedures: The Italian Regime
    • Gustavo Minervini, Viola v. Italy: A First Step Towards the End of Life Imprisonment in Italy
    • Paola Mariani, Unilateral Measures in a No-Deal Brexit: The Italian Way to Mitigate the Impact of an Abrupt Change of Regulation

Sunday, November 22, 2020

New Volume: Recueil des Cours

Volume 409 of the Recueil des Cours, Collected Courses of the Hague Academy of International Law is out. Contents include:
  • Volume 409
    • Yuval Shany, The Extraterritorial Application of International Human Rights Law
    • Samantha Besson, La due diligence en droit international

Friday, November 20, 2020

Conference: Disruptive Technologies and International Law

On December 7-9, 2020, the Stockton Center for International Law of the U.S. Naval War College will hold an online conference on "Disruptive Technologies and International Law." The conference is co-sponsored by Directorate Legal Services (Royal Air Force), the West Point Lieber Institute for Law and Land Warfare, the United States Army National Security Law Division, United States Air Force Academy, and the Yale Law School Paul Tsai China Center. The program is here.

Thursday, November 19, 2020

New Issue: Review of International Political Economy

The latest issue of the Review of International Political Economy (Vol. 27, no. 6, 2020) is out. Contents include:
  • Special Issue: International Financial Institutions and Gendered Circuits of Labour and Violence
    • Jacqui True & Aida A. Hozić, Don’t mention the war! International Financial Institutions and the gendered circuits of violence in post-conflict
    • Carol Cohn & Claire Duncanson, Whose recovery? IFI prescriptions for postwar states
    • Jennifer G. Mathers, Women, war and austerity: IFIs and the construction of gendered economic insecurities in Ukraine
    • Daniela Lai, What has justice got to do with it? Gender and the political economy of post-war Bosnia and Herzegovina
    • Vesna Bojičić-Dželilović & Aida A. Hozić, Taxing for inequalities: gender budgeting in the Western Balkans
    • Melissa Frances Johnston, Frontier finance: the role of microfinance in debt and violence in post-conflict Timor-Leste
  • Pedagogical Intervention
    • Juliette Schwak, Film in an IPE classroom: for a critical pedagogy of the everyday
  • Review Essay
    • Ignacio Puente & Ben Ross Schneider, Business and development: how organization, ownership and networks matter

Wednesday, November 18, 2020

Conference: ILA 79th Biennial Conference

The International Law Association will hold its 79th Biennial Conference entirely online from November 29 to December 13, 2020. The program is here.

Andersen & Khetarpal: As Protests Surge Globally, the UN Human Rights Committee Provides Timely Guidance

Elizabeth Andersen (World Justice Project) & Jaya Khetarpal (World Justice Project) have posted an ASIL Insight on As Protests Surge Globally, the UN Human Rights Committee Provides Timely Guidance.

New Issue: Transnational Environmental Law

The latest issue of Transnational Environmental Law (Vol. 9, no. 3, November 2020) is out. Contents include:
  • Editorial
    • Thijs Etty, Veerle Heyvaert, Cinnamon Carlarne, Bruce Huber, Jacqueline Peel, & Josephine van Zeben, Indigenous Rights Amidst Global Turmoil
  • Symposium: Indigenous Water Rights in Comparative Law
    • Elizabeth Macpherson, Symposium Foreword: Indigenous Water Rights in Comparative Law
    • Erin O’Donnell, Anne Poelina, Alessandro Pelizzon & Cristy Clark, Stop Burying the Lede: The Essential Role of Indigenous Law(s) in Creating Rights of Nature
    • Mihnea Tănăsescu, Rights of Nature, Legal Personality, and Indigenous Philosophies ˘
    • Karen Fisher & Meg Parsons, River Co-governance and Co-management in Aotearoa New Zealand: Enabling Indigenous Ways of Knowing and Being
    • Elizabeth J. Macpherson & Pia Weber Salazar, Towards a Holistic Environmental Flow Regime in Chile: Providing for Ecosystem Health and Indigenous Rights
    • Elizabeth Macpherson, Julia Torres Ventura & Felipe Clavijo Ospina, Constitutional Law, Ecosystems, and Indigenous Peoples in Colombia: Biocultural Rights and Legal Subjects
    • Anne Poelina, Donna Bagnall & Michelle Lim, Recognizing the Martuwarra’s First Law Right to Life as a Living Ancestral Being Martuwarra RiverOfLife,
  • Articles
    • Laura Schimmöller, Paving the Way for Rights of Nature in Germany: Lessons Learnt from Legal Reform in New Zealand and Ecuador
    • Huanhuan Wang, Retroactive Liability in China’s Soil Pollution Law: Lessons from Theoretical and Comparative Analysis

Tuesday, November 17, 2020

New Issue: Europa Ethnica

The latest issue of Europa Ethnica (Vol. 77, nos. 3/4, 2020). Contents include:
  • Anna-Maria Plautz, Leonie Hasenauer, Peter Čede & Ernst Steinicke, Das Ende der autochthonen Minderheiten im Kanaltal (Friaul/Italien)? Viersprachigkeit als Reminiszenz – regionale Identität als Emergenz
  • Oskar Peterlini, Hongkong – die Schwächen einer starken Autonomie Gründe für ihre Krise – Aufbau und Vergleich mit Südtirols Rechtssystem
  • Gilbert Gornig, Minderheiten und Minderheitenschutz in Frankreich
  • Werner Pescosta, Die Ladiner heute und vor hundert Jahren
  • Thomas Benedikter, Die baskische Sprache macht weiter Boden gut
  • Holger Kremser, Die dänische Minderheit in Deutschland
  • Raffaella Ritucci, Kinder und Jugendliche multiethnischer Klassen in Turin: Komplexität, Chancen und Herausforderungen der Mehrsprachigkeit im Schulsystem
  • Olesja Sydorenko & Lubov Matsko, The Ukrainian language: origin, development and present-day situation

Conference: Forum on Investor-State Mediation

On December 8-9, 2020, the Investment Treaty Forum of the British Institute of International and Comparative Law in cooperation with the ISDS Mediation Working Group will host a Forum on Investor-State Mediation. The program is here.

New Issue: Asian Journal of International Law

The latest issue of the Asian Journal of International Law (Vol. 10, no. 2, July 2020) is out. Contents include:
  • Notes and Comments
    • Md Tabish Eqbal, Historicizing the Dual Categorization of the General Principles of Law by the ILC
  • Articles
    • Bjørn Kunoy, Classification of Seafloor Highs According to Legal Hermeneutics
    • Sean Richmond, Unbound in War? International Law and Britain's Participation in the Korean War
    • Vanshaj Ravi Jain, Broken Boundaries: Border and Identity Formation in Post-Colonial Punjab
    • Yuan Yi Zhu, Suzerainty, Semi-Sovereignty, and International Legal Hierarchies on China's Borderlands
    • Abdulmalik M. Altamimi, An Appraisal of the Gulf Cooperation Council's Mechanisms for Co-operation and the Settlement of Disputes
    • I Gusti Ngurah Parikesit Widiatedja, The Evolution of the Dispute Settlement Mechanism in Preferential Trade Agreements [PTAs]: The Case of Indonesia
    • Dilini Pathirana, The Paradox of Chinese Investments in Sri Lanka: Between Investment Treaty Protection and Commercial Diplomacy

Monday, November 16, 2020

New Issue: Revista Peruana de Derecho Internacional

The latest issue of Revista Peruana de Derecho Internacional (Vol. 70, no. 165, Mayo-Agosto 2020) is out. Contents include:
  • Manuel Rodríguez Cuadros, El Espacio Nacional Y Las Fronteras Como Variables De Las Relaciones Internacionales Y De La Política Exterior: La Especificidad De Las Negociaciones Territoriales
  • Oscar Schiappa-Pietra, La Pandemia Del Covid-19 Ante El Derecho Internacional: Una Exploración Preliminar
  • Oswaldo de Rivero Barreto, Un Mundo Apolar: Anárquico Y Violento
  • Fernando D’Alessio Ipinza, Frederick H. Hartmann Y La Relación De Las Naciones
  • Alan Fairlie Reinoso, Integración Regional Y Convergencia En Contexto Internacional Adverso
  • Humberto Umeres Alvarez, El Debate Juridico-Politico Del Parlamento Aleman Del 10 De Marzo De 1965 Como Antecedente Inmediato De La Convencion De Las Nn.Uu. Sobre La Imprescriptibilidad De Los Crimenes De Guerra Y De Los Crimenes De Lesa Humanidad
  • Jorge Colunge Villacorta, La Prision Preventiva Y El Derecho Internacional
  • Ricardo Arredondo, El Asalto De Trump Al Derecho Internacional: Su Impacto En La Omc
  • Carmen Montero Ferrer, La Expresión Del ‘Interés’ En Los Amicus Curiae Presentados Por La Sociedad Civil Ante La Corte Penal Internacional
  • Márcio Ricardo Staffen, Burocratizar Para No Corromper: El Impacto De Los Actores Transnacionales En Las Medidas Anticorrupción De La Estrategia Nacional Para Combatir La Corrupción Y Blanqueo De Capitales
  • Jorge Luis Silva González, Yesenia Tamayo Zamora, & Amarys Morejón Madiedo, La Recepción Y Jerarquía De Los Tratados En El Derecho Interno De Los Estados Americanos
  • Juan Francisco Morales Giraldo, Las Raíces Epistemológicas Del Realismo Estructural: Modelos Y Representación En La Teoría De Relaciones Internacionales
  • Mijail Quispe Sandoval, Posibilidades Y Beneficios De Una Extension Del Espacio De Integracion Fronterizo Con Chile Mas Alla De Tacna Y Arica

New Issue: Human Rights Quarterly

The latest issue of the Human Rights Quarterly (Vol. 42, no. 4, November 2020) is out. Contents include:
  • Mattia Pinto, Historical Trends of Human Rights Gone Criminal
  • Suzanne Egan, Transforming the UN Human Rights Treaty System: A Realistic Appraisal
  • Jessika Eichler, “Migrating Recognition” or “Constitutionalism Reversed”: Relating Andean Plurinational Constitutionalism and European Integration Politics
  • W. Kathy Tannous & Alicia Gaffney, Charles H. Malik and Religious Freedom: The Influence of Biography on Malik’s Contributions to the Drafting of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights
  • Aoife Daly & Catherine O’Sullivan, Sexuality Education and International Standards: Insisting Upon Children’s Rights
  • Lorenza B. Fontana, The Contentious Politics of Labor Rights as Human Rights: Lessons from the Implementation of Domestic Workers Rights in the Philippines
  • Mark S. Berlin, Revising the “Hibernation” Narrative: Technocratic Legal Experts and the Cold War Origins of the “Justice Cascade”
  • Wade M. Cole & Gaëlle Perrier, Is Religion Really the Enemy of Human Rights? A Reply to Cingranelli and Kalmick
  • David L. Cingranelli & Carl Kalmick, Yes, Societal Religiosity and Muslim Governments Threaten Human Rights

Sunday, November 15, 2020

New Issue: Revista Española de Derecho Internacional

The latest issue of the Revista Española de Derecho Internacional (Vol. 72, no. 2, 2020) is out. Contents include:
  • Estudios
    • Carlos Espaliú Berdud, Locus standi de los Estados y obligaciones erga omnes en la jurisdicción contenciosa de la Corte Internacional de Justicia
    • José Ángel López Jiménez, Bielorrusia existe: equilibrio inestable entre una política exterior multivectorial y el Tratado de Unión con Rusia
    • Jonathan Pass, El statecraft institucional de China dentro del orden internacional liberal: el Banco Asiático de Inversión en Infrastructura
    • Beatriz Pérez de las Heras, La Unión Europea en la transición hacia la neutralidad climática: retos y estrategias en la implementación del Acuerdo de París
    • M.ª Ángeles Sánchez Jiménez, Acción de responsabilidad parental vinculada a un proceso de divorcio en el nuevo Reglamento (UE) 2019/1111
    • Estudios Sobre España Y El Derecho Internacional
    • María Amparo Alcoceba Gallego, Límites a la discrecionalidad del Estado español en el ejercicio de la protección diplomática
    • Crespo Navarro, Elena: La naturaleza de la protección diplomática en el caso Couso: la compleja relación entre Derecho internacional y Derecho interno
    • Ángel Sánchez Legido, Las devoluciones en caliente españolas ante el Tribunal de Estrasburgo: ¿Apuntalando los muros de la Europa fortaleza?
    • Jesús Verdú Baeza, España y los problemas de aplicación del Convenio de aguas de lastre en el área del estrecho de Gibraltar. A propósito del alga invasora Rugulopterix okamurae
  • Foro
    • El Derecho De Las Relaciones Exteriores
    • Montserrat Abad Castelos, Nota introductoria. El Derecho español de las relaciones exteriores
    • Carlos Espósito, El Derecho español de las relaciones exteriores
    • Javier Roldán Barbero, Derecho español de las relaciones exteriores: ¿Un tertium genus?
    • La Sentencia Del Tribunal Constitucional 132/2019
    • Miguel Gardeñes Santiago, Nota introductoria. El estado de la plurilegislación civil en España tras la Sentencia del Tribunal Constitucional 132/2019
    • Santiago Álvarez González, La STC 132/2019, sobre el Libro VI del Código Civil de Cataluña. ¿Incidente o punto de inflexión?
    • Albert Font i Segura, La STC 132/2019, sobre el Libro VI del Código Civil de Cataluña. ¿Una cuestión de principios?
    • 75 Años De Naciones Unidas
    • Rafael Grasa, Nota introductoria. 75 años de Naciones Unidas: balance y reflexiones sobre su futuro en el nuevo sistema internacional
    • Itziar Ruiz-Giménez Arrieta, Algunas reflexiones teóricas sobre la relevancia actual de Naciones Unidas
    • Pol Bargés, La ONU y la idea de «sostener la paz» en un mundo multipolar

New Issue: Swiss Review of International and European Law

The latest issue of the Swiss Review of International and European Law (Vol. 30, no. 4, 2020) is out. Contents include:
  • Articles
    • Leander D. Loacker & Gian Andri Capaul, Gibt es einen "unechten" Auslandsbezug? Zur Frage ausschliesslich rechtswahlbegründeter Internationalität und ihrer Beurteilung nach dem IPRG
    • Alexander R. E. Kistler & Michael Daphinoff, Der Schiedsgerichtsbarkeitsausschluss der EuGVVO und des Lugano Übereinkommens
    • Georges Pavlidis, Asset Recovery in the Context of International Criminal Court Proceedings in Light of FATF Standards

Madsen & Slosser: Institutionally Embodied Law: Cognitive Linguistics and the Making of International Law

Mikael Madsen (Univ. of Copenhagen - Law) & Jacob Livingston Slosser (Univ. of Copenhagen - iCourts) have posted Institutionally Embodied Law: Cognitive Linguistics and the Making of International Law. Here's the abstract:
This chapter examines language’s role in the formation of legal categories. It situates itself within the tension that exists between the certainty that seems to exist when applying legal categories (as realised through principles, rules or standards) and the ambiguity that necessarily comes with them. This chapter holds that legal categories are not just subject to whims of negotiated power dynamics and firm political choices but under-girding those choices are the dynamics of how human beings - i.e. lawyers, lawmakers, jurists, judges, and their respective staffs – operationalise the cognitive processes that enable category building and their application to legal decisions. We focus on the process of law making by cognitive category making. We promote a methodological intervention to examine the processes of classification and categorisation of legal principles to explore the politics of legal practice in action as, in part, an embodied cognitive process. Although public hearings, consultation, and deliberation are all part of the legal process, we focus on how law is performed as a written exercise with the goal of understanding the law through its use of linguistic choices. The result an exploration of how that language displays the cognitive underpinnings of legal category making and the development of legal institutions, legal rules and, more broadly, the law itself.

Afroukh & Marguénaud: Protocole N°16 à la Convention européenne des droits de l’homme

Mustapha Afroukh
& Jean-Pierre Marguénaud have published Le Protocole N°16 à la Convention européenne des droits de l’homme : Actes du séminaire du 19 avril 2019 (Pedone 2020). The table of contents is here. Here's the abstract:

Fruit d’un séminaire organisé par l’IDEDH en avril 2019, le présent ouvrage – Le Protocole n° 16 à la Convention européenne des droits de l’homme – porte sur une question importante et d‘actualité, à savoir les rapports de systèmes de protection des droits et libertés. Entré en vigueur le 1er août 2018 à la suite de sa 10ème ratification par la France, ce protocole permet aux plus hautes juridictions d’un Etat, de saisir la Cour européenne d’une demande d’avis sur des « questions de principe relatives à l’interprétation ou à l’application des droits et libertés définis par la Convention ou ses protocoles ». Partant de l’hypothèse que le Protocole n° 16 replace le juge national au cœur de la protection des droits et libertés et qu’elle invite à repenser le rôle de la Convention européenne des droits de l’homme dans l’ordre juridique interne, l’ambition de l’ouvrage est de prendre l’exacte mesure de ses effets sur le système européen de protection des droits de l’homme et ses potentialités en termes de dialogue des juges. Ainsi, en prise sur les développements les plus récents en particulier l’activation récente du mécanisme par la Cour de cassation dans une affaire particulièrement sensible, l’ouvrage permet de croiser les points de vues sur la manière dont les juridictions suprêmes appréhendent cette nouvelle procédure consultative et sur son articulation avec d’autres contrôles ainsi qu’avec le renvoi préjudiciel devant la Cour de justice de l’Union européenne. Un premier bilan de ce mécanisme optionnel d’avis consultatif en souligne son utilité certaine, ses spécificités et ses ambiguïtés.

Zhao: Coopérer en droit international des cours d'eau transfrontaliers : État du droit et étude du cas chinois

Yue Zhao
(Université du Sichuan - Law) has published Coopérer en droit international des cours d'eau transfrontaliers : État du droit et étude du cas chinois (L'Harmattan 2020). Here's the abstract:
La plupart des cours d'eau transfrontaliers de la Chine prennent leur source en Chine. On prétend généralement que ce pays, profitant de sa position géohydrologique avantageuse, adopte une stratégie unilatérale dans ses projets hydrauliques. Cet ouvrage étudie de façon approfondie et systématique les pratiques de la Chine dans les coopérations hydriques bilatérales et multilatérales, en exposant sa vision du droit international, surtout en matière de cours d'eau transfrontaliers. À partir de l'exemple chinois, un nouvel éclairage est jeté sur un concept important, essentiel et complexe du droit international, à savoir l'obligation générale de coopérer.

Dinh: Rules of Origin for Services: From the Early Days of GATS to the Era of Servicification

Duy Dinh
(ASEAN) has published Rules of Origin for Services: From the Early Days of GATS to the Era of Servicification (Edward Elgar Publishing 2020). Here's the abstract:
In an era where services play an increasingly vital role in servicified global value chains, this insightful book provides a comprehensive study of legal aspects of rules of origin for services and their importance in international trade. The author identifies and examines the defects in the current approach to rules of origin for services through an astute analysis of these rules in the General Agreement on Trade in Services and in preferential trade agreements. In addition, by asserting that trade in goods and trade in services cannot be separated, the author provides a comparative analysis of rules of origin in these two fields, offering a better understanding of their boundaries and connections. Paving the way for further development, the author concludes that certain aspects of rules of origin for goods, such as the product-based approach, may be repurposed for services.

Kurban: Limits of Supranational Justice: The European Court of Human Rights and Turkey's Kurdish Conflict

Dilek Kurban
(The Hertie School) has published Limits of Supranational Justice: The European Court of Human Rights and Turkey's Kurdish Conflict (Cambridge Univ. Press 2020). Here's the abstract:
With its contextualized analysis of the European Court of Human Rights' (ECtHR) engagement in Turkey's Kurdish conflict since the early 1990s, Limits of Supranational Justice makes a much-needed contribution to scholarships on supranational courts and legal mobilization. Based on a socio-legal account of the efforts of Kurdish lawyers in mobilizing the ECtHR on behalf of abducted, executed, tortured and displaced civilians under emergency rule, and a doctrinal legal analysis of the ECtHR's jurisprudence in these cases, this book powerfully demonstrates the Strasbourg court's failure to end gross violations in the Kurdish region. It brings together legal, political, sociological and historical narratives, and highlights the factors enabling the perpetuation of state violence and political repression against the Kurds. The effectiveness of supranational courts can best be assessed in hard cases such as Turkey, and this book demonstrates the need for a reappraisal of current academic and jurisprudential approaches to authoritarian regimes.

Pobjie: COVID-19 and the Scope of the UN Security Council’s Mandate to Address Non-Traditional Threats to International Peace and Security

Erin Pobjie (Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law) has posted COVID-19 and the Scope of the UN Security Council’s Mandate to Address Non-Traditional Threats to International Peace and Security. Here's the abstract:
In Resolution 2532 (2020), the UN Security Council characterised the COVID-19 pandemic as an endangerment to international peace and security and, for the first time, demanded a general ceasefire and humanitarian pause in armed conflicts across the globe. This article analyses the resolution and its broader implications. In particular, it examines the significance of the Council’s characterisation of the COVID-19 pandemic, the binding powers of the Security Council for addressing threats to international peace and security which are not ‘threats to the peace’, and the implications for the Council’s mandate and the collective security framework. This article argues that the concept of ‘international peace and security’ under article 24(1) of the UN Charter – rather than article 39 ‘threats to the peace’ – is fundamental to the delimitation of the Security Council’s mandate and powers for addressing non-traditional threats to international peace and security such as pandemics and the climate crisis.

Kaplan, Pryles, & Bao: International Arbitration: When East Meets West: Liber Amicorum Michael Moser

Neil Kaplan
, Michael Pryles, & Chiann Bao have published International Arbitration: When East Meets West: Liber Amicorum Michael Moser (Wolters Kluwer 2020). The table of contents is here. Here's the abstract:
International Arbitration: When East Meets West provides an extensive review and comparison of mediation and other forms of dispute resolution practiced in Asia and the West. As Asia, China in particular, gains economic momentum and increasingly attracts global attention, disputes between Asian and Western parties will inevitably increase. This book, the first to address issues arising from these types of disputes in depth, collects incisive articles by both well-known Asian arbitrators and non-Asian practitioners with extensive experience dealing with arbitrations involving Asian parties, all under the aegis of Michael Moser, a Western-trained lawyer who had the foresight to build a China-focused dispute resolution practice at a time when it was not fashionable to do so. The chapters reflect Moser’s exemplary career as an independent arbitrator who has navigated between Asian and Western legal cultures seamlessly for decades. The upshot is an authoritative investigation of the differences and similarities of international arbitration between two contrasting cultures – both from a legal and social perspective – as well as a consideration of how each culture has influenced international arbitration practice overall.

Lin & Kysar: Climate Change Litigation in the Asia Pacific

Jolene Lin
(National Univ. of Singapore) & Douglas A. Kysar (Yale Univ.) have published Climate Change Litigation in the Asia Pacific (Cambridge Univ. Press 2020). The table of contents is here. Here's the abstract:
This is the first scholarly examination of climate change litigation in the Asia Pacific region. Bringing legal academics and lawyers from the Global South and Global North together, this book provides rich insights into how litigation can galvanize climate action in countries including Pakistan, Indonesia, Malaysia and China. Written in clear and accessible language, the fourteen chapters in this book shed light on the important question of how litigation may unfold as a potential regulatory pathway towards decarbonization in the world's most populous region.

Saturday, November 14, 2020

Gram-Skjoldager, Ikonomou, & Kahlert: Organizing the 20th-Century World: International Organizations and the Emergence of International Public Administration, 1920-1960s

Karen Gram-Skjoldager
(Aarhus Univ.), Haakon Andreas Ikonomou (Univ. of Copenhagen), & Torsten Kahlert (Univ. of Copenhagen) have published Organizing the 20th-Century World: International Organizations and the Emergence of International Public Administration, 1920-1960s (Bloomsbury 2020). The table of contents is here. Here's the abstract:

International Organizations play a pivotal role on the modern global stage and have done, this book argues, since the beginning of the 20th century. This volume offers the first historical exploration into the formative years of international public administrations, covering the birth of the League of Nations and the emergence of the second generation that still shape international politics today such as the UN, NATO and OECD.

Centring on Europe, where the multilaterization of international relations played out more intensely in the mid-20th century than in other parts of the world, it demonstrates a broad range of historiographical and methodological approaches to institutions in international history. The book argues that after several 'turns' (cultural, linguistic, material, transnational), international history is now better equipped to restate its core questions of policy and power with a view to their institutional dimensions. Making use of new approaches in the field, this book develops an understanding of the specific powers and roles of IO-administrations by delving into their institutional make-up.

Eslava: Trigueño International Law: On (Most of the World) Being (Always, Somehow) Out of Place

Luis Eslava (Univ. of Kent - Law) has posted Trigueño International Law: On (Most of the World) Being (Always, Somehow) Out of Place. Here's the abstract:
In this chapter I push concerns about the relationship between being ‘out of place’ and ‘in place’ in socio-legal research. My primary preoccupation is with the disciplining function of such categories, and in particular with the implications of assuming that one can ever be ‘in place’ – a stable ‘in-placeness’ from which an ‘out-of-placeness’ can be then judged. I am particularly concerned with this configuration because of its relation to my field of legal studies, international law.

New Issue: Ocean Development & International Law

The latest issue of Ocean Development & International Law (Vol. 51, no. 4, 2020) is out. Contents include:
  • Patricia Schneider, When Protest Goes to Sea: Theorizing Maritime Violence by Applying Social Movement Theory to Terrorism and Piracy in the Cases of Nigeria and Somalia
  • Yurika Ishii, Relevant Coasts and Relevant Area in the Maritime Delimitation of the EEZ and Continental Shelf
  • Alexandre Pereira da Silva, From Rocks to an Archipelago: The Brazilian Interpretation and Application of Article 121 of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea With Respect to the St. Peter and St. Paul Insular Features
  • Huaigao Qi, Maritime Delimitation Between China and North Korea in the North Yellow Sea

Virzo: La confisca nell'azione internazionale di contrasto ad attività criminali

Roberto Virzo
(Università degli Studi del Sannio - Law) has published La confisca nell'azione internazionale di contrasto ad attività criminali (Edizioni Scientifiche Italiane 2020). Here's the abstract:
Grazie alla sua duttilità tipologica e funzionale, la confisca è congeniale a un’incisiva azione internazionale di contrasto a gravi attività criminali, spesso a connotazione transnazionale e, in particolar modo, a quelle orientate al profitto. Dopo aver ricostruito il regime giuridico delle eterogenee misure di confisca previste in un numero crescente di accordi e atti internazionali, l’autore esamina la pertinente giurisprudenza internazionale e si chiede se la concreta attuazione di tali provvedimenti ablativi risulti conforme ai diritti umani garantiti da norme di diritto internazionale consuetudinario e convenzionale.

Call for Submissions: Palestine Yearbook of International Law

The Palestine Yearbook of International Law has issued a call for submissions for its volume 23. The deadline January 15, 2021. The call is here.

Friday, November 13, 2020

New Issue: International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics

The latest issue of International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics (Vol. 20, no. 4, December 2020) is out. Contents include:
  • Special Issue: No Significant Harm in International Water Law
    • Susanne Schmeier & Joyeeta Gupta, The principle of no significant harm in international water law
    • Owen McIntyre, The current state of development of the no significant harm principle: How far have we come?
    • Attila M. Tanzi, The inter-relationship between no harm, equitable and reasonable utilisation and cooperation under international water law
    • Mara Tignino & Christian Bréthaut, The role of international case law in implementing the obligation not to cause significant harm
    • Ruby Moynihan & Bjørn-Oliver Magsig, The role of international regimes and courts in clarifying prevention of harm in freshwater and marine environmental protection
    • Alistair Rieu-Clarke, The duty to take appropriate measures to prevent significant transboundary harm and private companies: insights from transboundary hydropower projects
    • Susanne Schmeier, Prior notification of planned measures: A response to the no-harm dilemma?
    • Otto Spijkers, The no significant harm principle and the human right to water
    • Dinara Ziganshina & Barbara Janusz-Pawletta, The principle of no significant harm in the Central Asian context
    • Joyeeta Gupta & Susanne Schmeier, Future proofing the principle of no significant harm

New Issue: International Affairs

The latest issue of International Affairs (Vol. 96, no. 6, November 2020) is out. Contents include:
  • Articles
    • Jinghan Zeng, Artificial intelligence and China's authoritarian governance
    • Selina Ho, Infrastructure and Chinese power
    • Hoo Tiang Boon & Hannah Elyse Sworn, Strategic ambiguity and the Trumpian approach to China–Taiwan relations
    • Rory Miller & Sarah Cardaun, Multinational security coalitions and the limits of middle power activism in the Middle East: the Saudi case
    • Alice Hills, The dynamics of prototypical police forces: lessons from two Somali cities
    • Stephen McLoughlin, The role of political leaders in mitigating the risk of mass atrocities: an analysis of Khama, Kaunda and Nyerere
    • Rebecca Tapscott, Militarized masculinity and the paradox of restraint: mechanisms of social control under modern authoritarianism
    • Nina Wilén, Female peacekeepers’ added burden
    • Sarina Theys & Katharina Rietig, The influence of small states: how Bhutan succeeds in influencing global sustainability governance
    • Morena Skalamera, The 2020 oil price dive in a carbon-constrained era: strategies for energy exporters in central Asia
    • Columba Achilleos-Sarll, ‘Seeing’ the Women, Peace and Security agenda: visual (re)productions of WPS in UK government national action plans

Thursday, November 12, 2020

Radi: Rules and Practices of International Investment Law and Arbitration

Yannick Radi
(UCLouvain - Law) has published Rules and Practices of International Investment Law and Arbitration (Cambridge Univ. Press 2020). Here's the abstract:
International investment law and arbitration is its own 'galaxy', made up of thousands of treaties to be read in relation to hundreds of awards. It is also diverse, as treaty and arbitration practices display nuances and differences on a number of issues. While it has been expanding over the past few decades in quantitative terms, this galaxy is now developing new traits as a reaction to the criticisms formulated across civil society in relation to the protection of public interest. This textbook enables readers to master and make sense of this galaxy in motion. It offers an up-to-date, comprehensive and detailed analysis of the rules and practices which form international investment law and arbitration, covering its substantive, institutional and procedural aspects. Using analytical and practice-oriented approaches, it provides analyses accessible to readers discovering this field anew, while it offers a wealth of in-depth studies to those who are already familiar with it.

Borlini: On Financial Nationalism and International Law: Sovereignty, Cooperation and Hard/Soft Governance in International Finance

Leonardo Borlini (Univ. Bocconi - Law) has posted On Financial Nationalism and International Law: Sovereignty, Cooperation and Hard/Soft Governance in International Finance (European Journal of International Law, forthcoming). Here's the abstract:
The prevailing view among legal scholars over the last decade is that international financial collaboration is a resolutely cooperative venture that cannot be reduced to the interests or relative power of individual states. Moving along this line, the book under review shows that the protection of financial nationalism contributes to the creation of global systemic risks. In this review essay, I discuss the three overarching themes addressed in the book – namely, the logic of financial nationalism, the role of soft and hard law in the international governance of finance and the related problem of compliance. International financial law is still emerging as a discipline and the issues under discussion are at the heart of the ongoing debate about how to devise adequate international structures and international norms to govern markets and control systemic risks in finance. Proceeding from a critical approach to the international law of finance, I analyse the book’s focus on financial nationalism and the limits of its juxtaposition with the economic logic of externalities; the case for strengthened formalization; and, finally, the extent to which the theoretical framework proposed in the book is relevant for rethinking the logic and prospect of compliance in international finance.

New Issue: African Journal of International and Comparative Law

The latest issue of the African Journal of International and Comparative Law (Vol. 28, Supplement, 2020) is out. Contents include:
  • Special Issue: The Judicial Power of Africa's Supranational Courts
    • Johannes Hendrik Fahner, The Judicial Power of Africa's Supranational Courts: Introduction
    • Séverine Menetrey, La juridictionnalisation du droit dans les espaces sous-régionaux en Afrique
    • Apollin Koagne Zouapet, Le champ opératoire de l'activisme judiciaire supranational en Afrique. Une tentative de systématisation
    • Misha Ariana Plagis, The Makings of Remedies: The (R)evolution of the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights' Remedies Regime in Fair Trial Cases
    • Mamadou Bakaye Dembele, La condamnation du Mali par la Cour africaine des droits de l'homme, vers une ultime relecture du code des personnes et de la famille
    • Kehinde Ibrahim, The Puzzling Paradox Presented within the African Supranational Judicial Institutions: The ECOWAS Court of Justice
    • Francesca Mussi, From the Campbell Case to a Recent Ruling of the Constitutional Court of South Africa: Is There Any Hope to Revive the Tribunal of the Southern African Development Community?
    • Olabisi D. Akinkugbe, Dispute Settlement under the African Continental Free Trade Area Agreement: A Preliminary Assessment

New Issue: Jus Cogens

The latest issue of Jus Cogens (Vol. 2, no. 3, 2020) is out. Contents include:
  • Patrik Fridlund, Post-truth Politics, Performatives and the Force
  • Kriszta Kovács, Parliamentary Democracy by Default: Applying the European Convention on Human Rights to Presidential Elections and Referendums
  • Maurits Helmich, Spain, Catalonia, and the Supposed Authority of the Judiciary
  • Matteo Mandarini, The Vicissitudes of Representation

Wednesday, November 11, 2020

Lefkowitz: Philosophy and International Law: A Critical Introduction

David Lefkowitz
(Univ. of Richmond - Philosophy) has published Philosophy and International Law: A Critical Introduction (Cambridge Univ. Press 2020). Here's the abstract:
In Philosophy and International Law, David Lefkowitz examines core questions of legal and political philosophy through critical reflection on contemporary international law. Is international law really law? The answer depends on what makes law. Does the existence of law depend on coercive enforcement? Or institutions such as courts? Or fidelity to the requirements of the rule of law? Or conformity to moral standards? Answers to these questions are essential for determining the truth or falsity of international legal skepticism, and understanding why it matters. Is international law morally defensible? This book makes a start to answering that question by engaging with recent debates on the nature and grounds of human rights, the moral justifiability of the law of war, the concept of a crime against humanity, the moral basis of universal jurisdiction, the propriety of international law governing secession, and the justice of international trade law.

Inaugural Issue: TWAIL Review

The inaugural issue of the TWAIL Review (no. 1, 2020) is out. Contents include:
  • Antony Anghie, Welcoming the TWAIL Review
  • TWAILR Editorial Collective, A Journal for a Community
  • Karin Mickelson, Hope in a TWAIL Register
  • James Gathii, Africa and the Radical Origins of the Right to Development
  • Rajshree Chandra, The “Moral Economy” of Cosmopolitan Commons
  • Fabia Fernandes Carvalho Veçoso, Resisting Intervention through Sovereign Debt: A Redescription of the Drago Doctrine
  • Paulo Ilich Bacca, The Double Bind and the Reverse Side of the International Legal Order: Talking with Silvia Rivera Cusicanqui and El Colectivo
  • Ali Hammoudi, The International Law of Informal Empire and the “Question of Oman”
  • Hailegabriel G. Feyissa, Non-European Imperialism and Europeanisation of Law: Complexities of Legal Codification in Imperial Ethiopia

New Issue: Leiden Journal of International Law

The latest issue of the Leiden Journal of International Law (Vol. 33, no. 4, December 2020) is out. Contents include:
  • Editorial
    • Carsten Stahn, Reckoning with colonial injustice: International law as culprit and as remedy?
  • LJIL Lecture 2019
    • Karen J. Alter, Visions of International Law: An Interdisciplinary Retrospective
  • International Legal Theory
    • Rosemary Byrne, Gregor Noll, & Jens Vedsted-Hansen, Understanding the Crisis of Refugee Law: Legal Scholarship and the EU Asylum System
    • Ulf Linderfalk, The Legal Consequences of Jus Cogens and the Individuation of Norms
    • Philipp Kastner & Elisabeth Roy Trudel, Unsettling International Law and Peace-Making: An Encounter with Queer Theory
  • International Law and Practice
    • Maiko Meguro, Litigating Climate Change through International Law: Obligations Strategy and Rights Strategy
    • Bartłomiej Sierzputowsk, Public International Law in the Context of Post-German Cultural Property Held Within Poland’s Borders. A Complicated Situation or Simply a Resolution?
  • International Criminal Courts and Tribunals: Symposium on Resilience and the Impacts of Hybrid Courts
    • Kirsten Ainley & Mark Kersten, Resilience and the Impacts of Hybrid Courts
    • Caitlin McCaffrie, An Educational Legacy: Exploring the Links Between Education and Resilience at the ECCC
    • Aaron Fichtelberg, Identity Politics and Hybrid Tribunals
    • Eric Wiebelhaus-Brahm, The Concept of Resilience and the Evaluation of Hybrid Courts
    • Michail Vagias, Hybrid Court Resilience and the Selection of Cases

Tuesday, November 10, 2020

Sulyok: Science and Judicial Reasoning: The Legitimacy of International Environmental Adjudication

Katalin Sulyok
(ELTE Univ. - Law) has published Science and Judicial Reasoning: The Legitimacy of International Environmental Adjudication (Cambridge Univ. Press 2020). Here's the abstract:
Science, which inevitably underlies environmental disputes, poses significant challenges for the scientifically untrained judges who decide such cases. In addition to disrupting ordinary fact-finding and causal inquiry, science can impact the framing of disputes and the standard of review. Judges must therefore adopt various tools to adjust the level of science allowed to enter their deliberations, which may fundamentally impact the legitimacy of their reasoning. While neglecting or replacing scientific authority can erode the convincing nature of judicial reasoning, the same authority, when treated properly, may lend persuasive force to adjudicatory findings, and buttress the legitimacy of judgments. In this work, Katalin Sulyok surveys the environmental case law of seven major jurisdictions and analyzes framing techniques, evidentiary procedures, causal inquiries and standards of review, offering valuable insight into how judges justify their choices between rival scientific claims in a convincing and legitimate manner.

Kurz: Jewish Internationalism and Human Rights after the Holocaust

Nathan A. Kurz
(Birkbeck College, Univ. of London) has published Jewish Internationalism and Human Rights after the Holocaust (Cambridge Univ. Press 2020). Here's the abstract:
Nathan A. Kurz charts the fraught relationship between Jewish internationalism and international rights protection in the second half of the twentieth century. For nearly a century, Jewish lawyers and advocacy groups in Western Europe and the United States had pioneered forms of international rights protection, tying the defense of Jews to norms and rules that aspired to curb the worst behavior of rapacious nation-states. In the wake of the Holocaust and the creation of the State of Israel, however, Jewish activists discovered they could no longer promote the same norms, laws and innovations without fear they could soon apply to the Jewish state. Using previously unexamined sources, Nathan Kurz examines the transformation of Jewish internationalism from an effort to constrain the power of nation-states to one focused on cementing Israel's legitimacy and its status as a haven for refugees from across the Jewish diaspora.

Zorzi Giustiniani: WHO’s to blame for the coronavirus pandemic? A tentative assessment of WHO’s role in the crisis

Flavia Zorzi Giustiniani (Università Telematica Internazionale Uninettuno - Law) has published WHO’s to blame for the coronavirus pandemic? A tentative assessment of WHO’s role in the crisis (federalismi.it, n. 30/2020).

Gaskins: The Congo Trials in the International Criminal Court

Richard Gaskins
(Brandeis Univ.) has published The Congo Trials in the International Criminal Court (Cambridge Univ. Press 2020). Here's the abstract:
This is the first in-depth study of the first three ICC trials: an engaging, accessible text meant for specialists and students, for legal advocates and a wide range of professionals concerned with diverse cultures, human rights, and restorative justice. It introduces international justice and courtroom trials in practical terms, offering a balanced view on persistent tensions and controversies. Separate chapters analyze the working realities of central African armed conflicts, finding reasons for their surprising resistance to ICC legal formulas. The book dissects the Court's structural dynamics, which were designed to steer an elusive middle course between high moral ideals and hard political realities. Detailed chapters provide vivid accounts of courtroom encounters with four Congolese suspects. The mixed record of convictions, acquittals, dissents, and appeals, resulting from these trials, provides a map of distinct fault-lines within the ICC legal code, and suggests a rocky path ahead for the Court's next ventures.

DiMatteo, Infantino, & Potin: The Cambridge Handbook of Judicial Control of Arbitral Awards

Larry A. DiMatteo
(Univ. of Florida), Marta Infantino (Univ. of Trieste), & Nathalie M-P Potin (Lyon Catholic Univ.) have published The Cambridge Handbook of Judicial Control of Arbitral Awards (Cambridge Univ. Press 2020). The table of contents is here. Here's the abstract:
A unique collaboration between academic scholars, legal practitioners, and arbitrators, this handbook focuses on the intersection of arbitration - as an alternative to litigation - and the court systems to which arbitration is ultimately beholden. The first three parts analyze issues relating to the interpretation of the scope of arbitration agreements, arbitrator bias and conflicts of interest, arbitrator misconduct during the proceedings, enforceability of arbitral awards, and the grounds for vacating awards. The next section features fifteen country-specific reviews, which demonstrate that, despite the commonality of principles at the international level, there is a significant amount of differences in the application of those principles at the national level. This work should be read by anyone interested in the general rules and principles of the enforceability of foreign arbitral awards and the grounds for courts to vacate or annul such awards.

Wertheim: Tomorrow, the World: The Birth of U.S. Global Supremacy

Stephen Wertheim
(Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft) has published Tomorrow, the World: The Birth of U.S. Global Supremacy (Harvard Univ. Press 2020). Here's the abstract:

For most of its history, the United States avoided making political and military commitments that would entangle it in European-style power politics. Then, suddenly, it conceived a new role for itself as the world’s armed superpower—and never looked back. In Tomorrow, the World, Stephen Wertheim traces America’s transformation to the crucible of World War II, especially in the months prior to the attack on Pearl Harbor. As the Nazis conquered France, the architects of the nation’s new foreign policy came to believe that the United States ought to achieve primacy in international affairs forevermore.

Scholars have struggled to explain the decision to pursue global supremacy. Some deny that American elites made a willing choice, casting the United States as a reluctant power that sloughed off “isolationism” only after all potential competitors lay in ruins. Others contend that the United States had always coveted global dominance and realized its ambition at the first opportunity. Both views are wrong. As late as 1940, the small coterie of officials and experts who composed the U.S. foreign policy class either wanted British preeminence in global affairs to continue or hoped that no power would dominate. The war, however, swept away their assumptions, leading them to conclude that the United States should extend its form of law and order across the globe and back it at gunpoint. Wertheim argues that no one favored “isolationism”—a term introduced by advocates of armed supremacy in order to turn their own cause into the definition of a new “internationalism.”

We now live, Wertheim warns, in the world that these men created. A sophisticated and impassioned narrative that questions the wisdom of U.S. supremacy, Tomorrow, the World reveals the intellectual path that brought us to today’s global entanglements and endless wars.

Monday, November 9, 2020

Prodromou: The Public Order Exception in International Trade, Investment, Human Rights and Commercial Disputes

Zena Prodromou
(Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan LLP ) has published The Public Order Exception in International Trade, Investment, Human Rights and Commercial Disputes (Wolters Kluwer 2020). Here's the abstract:
The Public Order Exception in International Trade, Investment, Human Rights and Commercial Disputes is a trailblazer book that analyses on a stand-alone as well as on a comparative basis – from a substantive and also from a procedural perspective – the public order exception’s application in international dispute resolution. Parties to international disputes increasingly invoke the need to protect the domestic public order in order to justify actions otherwise in breach of their obligations under international law. The term ‘public order’ nevertheless remains unclear as do the criteria and factors against which different international dispute bodies assess the parties’ respective claims. This unique book presents, systematizes and synthesizes all relevant jurisprudence in this field of law, identifies points of controversy and provides practical insights on the factors and grounds that are determinate in both upholding and dismissing the exception’s application.

5th SIEL Conversation: The Impact of Covid-19 on the Belt and Road Initiative

The 5th SIEL Conversation, on the topic "The Impact of Covid-19 on the Belt and Road Initiative," will take place on Thursday, November 19, 2020. Registration and other details are available here.

Beverelli, Kurtz, & Raess: International Trade, Investment, and the Sustainable Development Goals

Cosimo Beverelli
(World Trade Organization), Jürgen Kurtz (European Univ. Institute), & Damian Raess (Univ. of Bern - World Trade Institute) have published International Trade, Investment, and the Sustainable Development Goals (Cambridge Univ. Press 2020). The table of contents is here. Here's the abstract:
In September 2015, world leaders adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) represent a distinctive approach to development that moves away from a narrow perspective on economic development to an integrative agenda that simultaneously pursues ecological, social and economic goals. Trade and foreign investment are important economic vectors through which many of these goals can be achieved. Much depends, however, on whether and how SDGs are incorporated in international trade and investment agreements, and in private or public sector initiatives. Policymakers are also confronted with the interdependence of the SDGs which raises difficult trade-offs between various Goals. The contributions in this book explore the penetration and trade-offs of the SDGs, drawing on a multi-disciplinary approach incorporating insights from economists, lawyers and political scientists. The book offers a valuable guide for scholars and policy makers in identifying and evaluating the complex challenges related to sustainable development.

New Issue: Security Studies

The latest issue of Security Studies (Vol. 29, no. 4, 2020) is out. Contents include:
  • Security Studies in a New Era of Maritime Competition
    • Jonathan D. Caverley & Peter Dombrowski, Too Important to Be Left to the Admirals: The Need to Study Maritime Great-Power Competition
    • Erik Gartzke & Jon R. Lindsay, The Influence of Sea Power on Politics: Domain- and Platform-Specific Attributes of Material Capabilities
    • Sara McLaughlin Mitchell, Clashes at Sea: Explaining the Onset, Militarization, and Resolution of Diplomatic Maritime Claims
    • Jonathan D. Caverley & Peter Dombrowski, Cruising for a Bruising: Maritime Competition in an Anti-Access Age
    • Paul van Hooft, All-In or All-Out: Why Insularity Pushes and Pulls American Grand Strategy to Extremes
    • Fiona S. Cunningham, The Maritime Rung on the Escalation Ladder: Naval Blockades in a US-China Conflict
    • Evan Braden Montgomery, Primacy and Punishment: US Grand Strategy, Maritime Power, and Military Options to Manage Decline

AJIL Unbound Symposium: COVID-19, Global Mobility and International Law

AJIL Unbound has posted a symposium on "COVID-19, Global Mobility and International Law." The symposium includes an introduction by E. Tendayi Achiume, Thomas Gammeltoft-Hansen, and Thomas Spijkerboer and contributions by Guofu Liu, Frédéric Mégret, Florian F. Hoffmann and Isadora d'Avila Lima Nery Gonçalves, Tesseltje de Lange, Sandra Mantu, and Paul Minderhoud, Abdoulaye Hamadou, John Reynolds, and Ian M. Kysel and Chantal Thomas.