Saturday, January 26, 2019

Call for Submissions: Deconsolidation of Democracy, Populism, and the Role of Human Rights Law/Scholars

The journal Diritti umani e diritto internazionale has issued a call for submissions for a forum on "Deconsolidation of Democracy, Populism, and the Role of Human Rights Law/Scholars" that will appear in its summer issue. The call is here.

Schultz: The Internal Protection Alternative in Refugee Law

Jessica Schultz (Chr. Michelsen Institute) has published The Internal Protection Alternative in Refugee Law: Treaty Basis and Scope of Application under the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees and Its 1967 Protocol (Brill | Nijhoff 2019) Here's the abstract:
Under what circumstances can a state refuse refugee status to a person whose risk of persecution exists in only part of her country of origin? This book is the first monograph to examine the treaty basis and criteria for the ‘internal protection alternative’ (IPA), an exception to refugee status increasingly invoked by state parties to the 1951 Refugee Convention and its 1967 Protocol. Through a critical analysis of the relationship between refugee law and related fields, Schultz finds that the legal scope for IPA practice is narrower than is commonly claimed. Since persons subject to an IPA analysis have a well-founded fear of persecution within their countries of origin, any limit on their right to refugee status must involve a careful balancing of the impact of continued displacement against the state's interest in preserving its restricted protection resources. She argues that the doctrine of implied limits in human rights law can provide analytic structure to the IPA concept and reduce the risk of overly broad application.

Collins: The Public International Law of Trade in Legal Services

David Collins (City, Univ. of London - Law) has published The Public International Law of Trade in Legal Services (Cambridge Univ. Press 2019). Here's the abstract:
This book examines the international legal regime covering trade in legal services. While legal services are a vital component of the economies of many developed and emerging countries, they remain poorly liberalized with numerous restrictions undermining market access for foreign suppliers. Although some modern bilateral and regional trade agreements have begun to address barriers to trade in legal services, few go beyond the basic commitments of non-discrimination and transparency contained in the WTO GATS. This book approaches the pressing need to open the global market for trade in legal services across the four modes of supply: cross border, consumption abroad, commercial presence and temporary movement of natural persons. It considers changes under way within the legal profession brought about by alternative business structures and technology. Both underscore the importance of reconceptualizing trade in legal services as one that should be as open as possible with a view to maximizing competition while safeguarding the needs of clients.

Steinitz: The Case for an International Court of Civil Justice

Maya Steinitz (Univ. of Iowa - Law) has published The Case for an International Court of Civil Justice (Cambridge Univ. Press 2019). Here's the abstract:
When multinational corporations cause mass harms to lives, livelihoods, and the environment in developing countries, it is nearly impossible for victims to find a court that can and will issue an enforceable judgment. In this work, Professor Maya Steinitz presents a detailed rationale for the creation of an International Court of Civil Justice (ICCJ) to hear such transnational mass tort cases. The world's legal systems were not designed to solve these kinds of complex transnational disputes, and the absence of mechanisms to ensure coordination means that victims try, but fail, to find justice in country after country, court after court. The Case for an International Court of Civil Justice explains how an ICCJ would provide victims with access to justice and corporate defendants with a non-corrupt forum and an end to the cost and uncertainty of unending litigation - more efficiently resolving the most complicated types of civil litigation.

Friday, January 25, 2019

New Addition to the UN Audiovisual Library of International Law

The Codification Division of the UN Office of Legal Affairs recently added a lecture to the UN Audiovisual Library of International Law. It was given by Carlos Espósito on “Inmunidad del Estado y Derechos Humanos.”

2019 Lauterpacht Memorial Lectures

On March 12-14, 2019, Tom Ginsburg (Univ. of Chicago - Law) will deliver the 2019 Sir Hersch Lauterpacht Memorial Lectures at the University of Cambridge. There will also be a question and answer session on March 15. The topic of the lectures is: "Democracies and International Law: The Trials of Liberalism."

Weber: Grundwasser im Völkerrecht

Carolin Mai Weber has published Grundwasser im Völkerrecht: Eine Untersuchung der Draft Articles der UN International Law Commission über das Recht grenzüberschreitender Aquifere im Kontext des internationalen Wasserrechts (Duncker & Humblot 2019). Here's the abstract:
Angesichts der globalen Wasserkrise steigt die Bedeutung von Grundwasservorkommen als Wasserressource stetig an. Grundwasservorkommen – auch Aquifere genannt – weisen eine hohe Anfälligkeit für Verschmutzung und Raubbau auf. Auch ist die Mehrzahl der Aquifere grenzüberschreitend. Vor diesem Hintergrund erscheint eine rechtliche Regelung dieser bedeutenden Wasserressource unerlässlich. Diese Arbeit setzt hier an und analysiert, inwiefern die jüngste Entwicklung im internationalen Grundwasserrecht – die Draft Articles der UN International Law Commission über das Recht grenzüberschreitender Aquifere – geeignet ist, den Schutz und die Erhaltung von grenzüberschreitenden Grundwasservorkommen effektiv zu regeln sowie eine angemessene Nutzung und Verteilung der Ressource zu gewährleisten. Gegenstand der Untersuchung sind Fragen zum rechtlichen Rahmen, zum Management grenzüberschreitender Aquifere sowie zu aktuellen Herausforderungen im internationalen Wasserrecht.

Land: The Marrakesh Treaty as 'Bottom Up' Lawmaking: Supporting Local Human Rights Action on IP Policies

Molly K. Land (Univ. of Connecticut - Law) has posted The Marrakesh Treaty as 'Bottom Up' Lawmaking: Supporting Local Human Rights Action on IP Policies (UC Irvine Law Review, Vol. 8, p. 513, 2018). Here's the abstract:

Global intellectual property rules have had adverse consequences for the promotion and protection of a range of human rights, including the rights to food, health, water, culture, equality and non discrimination, and freedom of expression. Nonetheless, these issues have been framed in human rights terms primarily at the international and regional levels. Domestic human rights advocates have largely not taken up the issue of how intellectual property law affects the enjoyment of human rights.

This Article argues that this incomplete translation is due to widespread reliance on a fairly narrow understanding of human rights. Human rights, when understood only as a set of legal rules and institutions, inevitably devolves into a debate about reconciling conflicting rights. This is an important conversation, but it is also a limiting one. The emancipatory potential of human rights often lies not in its power as a set of legal rules but in the way in which those rules can be employed by affected individuals to make claims and demand political change.

Using the case study of law and politics around intellectual property mobilization, the Article argues that framing intellectual property in more robust human rights terms is important for challenging the fundamental power structures that undergird the intellectual property regime. The Article then argues that the Marrakesh Treaty — a new treaty that requires states to create mandatory exceptions to copyright to protect the rights of individuals with disabilities — charts a new path for human rights advocacy on intellectual property. This treaty has the potential to lay a foundation for better translation of intellectual property issues into human rights advocacy by identifying a clear violation and by activating domestic human rights advocates. Creating a foundation for affected individuals and human rights advocates to participate in intellectual property lawmaking is essential to realizing the potential of human rights for revising the essential bargains of the international intellectual property system.

Çubukçu: For the Love of Humanity: The World Tribunal on Iraq

Ayça Çubukçu (London School of Economics - Human Rights) has published For the Love of Humanity: The World Tribunal on Iraq (Univ. of Pennsylvania Press 2018).

On February 15, 2003, millions of people around the world demonstrated against the war that the United States, the United Kingdom, and their allies were planning to wage in Iraq. Despite this being the largest protest in the history of humankind, the war on Iraq began the next month. That year, the World Tribunal on Iraq (WTI) emerged from the global antiwar movement that had mobilized against the invasion and subsequent occupation. Like the earlier tribunal on Vietnam convened by Bertrand Russell and Jean-Paul Sartre, the WTI sought to document—and provide grounds for adjudicating—war crimes committed by the United States, the United Kingdom, and their allied forces during the Iraq war.

For the Love of Humanity builds on two years of transnational fieldwork within the decentralized network of antiwar activists who constituted the WTI in some twenty cities around the world. Ayça Çubukçu illuminates the tribunal up close, both as an ethnographer and a sympathetic participant. In the process, she situates debates among WTI activists—a group encompassing scholars, lawyers, students, translators, writers, teachers, and more—alongside key jurists, theorists, and critics of global democracy.

WTI activists confronted many dilemmas as they conducted their political arguments and actions, often facing interpretations of human rights and international law that, unlike their own, were not grounded in anti-imperialism. Çubukçu approaches this conflict by broadening her lens, incorporating insights into how Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, and the Iraqi High Tribunal grappled with the realities of Iraq's occupation. Through critical analysis of the global debate surrounding one of the early twenty-first century's most significant world events, For the Love of Humanity addresses the challenges of forging global solidarity against imperialism and makes a case for reevaluating the relationships between law and violence, empire and human rights, and cosmopolitan authority and political autonomy.

New Volume: Recueil des Cours

Volume 393 of the Recueil des Cours, Collected Courses of the Hague Academy of International Law is out. Contents include:
  • Volume 393
    • Carmen Tiburcio, The Current Practice of International Cooperation in Civil Matters
    • Ruiz De Santiago, Aspects juridiques des mouvements forcés de personnes

Marochkin: The Operation of International Law in the Russian Legal System

Sergey Yu. Marochkin (Univ. of Tyumen - Law) has published The Operation of International Law in the Russian Legal System: A Changing Approach (Brill | Nijhoff 2019). Here's the abstract:
This book addresses the increased role and standing of international law in the Russian legal system through analysis of judicial practice since the adoption of the Russian Constitution in 1993. The issue of interaction and hierarchy between international and domestic law within the Russian Federation is studied, combining theoretical, legal and institutional elements. Sergey Marochkin explores how methods for incorporating and implementing international law (or reasons for failing to do so) have changed over time, influenced by internal and global policy. The final sections of the book are the most illustrative, examining how 'the rule of law’ remains subordinate to ‘the rule of politics’, both at the domestic and global level.

von Bogdandy, Salazar Ugarte, Morales Antoniazzi, & Ebert: El constitucionalismo transformador en América Latina y el derecho económico internacional. De la tensión al diálogo

Armin von Bogdandy, Pedro Salazar Ugarte, Mariela Morales Antoniazzi, & Franz Christian Ebert have published El constitucionalismo transformador en América Latina y el derecho económico internacional. De la tensión al diálogo (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México 2018). The table of contents is here.

New Issue: Journal of World Trade

The latest issue of the Journal of World Trade (Vol. 53, no. 1, 2019) is out. Contents include:
  • Zhang Xiangchen, Xu Qingjun, & Wang Jinyong, Capacity Constraint: A Fundamental Perspective for the Development Issue at WTO
  • Shujie Feng & Xiao Ma, To Increase Damages of Intellectual Property Infringement in China: A Double-Edged Sword for the Market
  • Ines Willemyns, GATS Classification of Digital Services – Does ‘The Cloud’ Have a Silver Lining?
  • Rex J. Zedalis, A Commentary on US ‘National Security’ Import Restraints: The Situation with Crude Oil
  • Margherita Melillo, Informal Dispute Resolution in Preferential Trade Agreements
  • Luciana Dutra De Oliveira Silveira, Can the WTO Bring More Teeth to the Global Anticorruption Agenda?
  • Nataliia Kozachuk, Counteracting SEP Abuse: In Search of a WTO-Consistent Approach
  • R.S. Neeraj, A Defining Act: How TPP Rules Are Undermining WTO Jurisprudence

New Issue: Legal Issues of Economic Integration

The latest issue of Legal Issues of Economic Integration (Vol. 46, no. 1, 2019) is out. Contents include:
  • From the Board, International Trade and the Regulation of Responsible Global Value Chains
  • Jonathan Mukwiri, Brexit and Implications for the Free Movement of Capital
  • Roberto Soprano, The Principle of Effectiveness in the Interpretation of the Protocol of Accession of China to the World Trade Organization: Market Economy Considerations in Anti-Dumping Investigations
  • Eirini Kikarea, Brexit and Preferential Trade Agreements: Issues of Termination and Survival Clauses
  • Saba L. Mollaian, Does Trade Equal Peace? The Role of the WTO in International Peace

Call for Papers: Legitimate Role for Investment Law and Arbitration in Protecting Human Rights

LEGINVEST and PluriCourts, in collaboration with Monash University and the Minerva Center for Human Rights at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, have issued a call for papers for a workshop on "Legitimate Role for Investment Law and Arbitration in Protecting Human Rights," which will take place September 4-5, 2019, in Oslo. The call is here.

Call for Papers: Eighth Annual Junior Faculty Forum for International Law (Reminder)

A reminder that a call for papers has been issued for the Eighth Annual Junior Faculty Forum for International Law, convened by Dino Kritsiotis (Univ. of Nottingham - Law), J.H.H. Weiler (New York Univ. - Law), Simon Chesterman (National Univ. of Singapore - Law), Antony T. Anghie (National Univ. of Singapore - Law; Univ. of Utah - Law), and Lucy F. Reed (National Univ. of Singapore - Law). The Eighth Forum will be held at the National University of Singapore on August 12-14, 2019. The deadline for applications is January 31, 2019. The call is here.

New Issue: The Law and Practice of International Courts and Tribunals

The latest issue of The Law and Practice of International Courts and Tribunals (Vol. 17, no. 3, 2018) is out. Contents include:
  • Makane Moïse Mbengue & Rukmini Das, Rules Governing the Use of Experts in International Disputes
  • Brianna Gorence, The Constructive Role of General Principles in International Arbitration
  • Alessandra Sardu, On the Execution of Investment Arbitral Awards in Recent Case Law
  • Yoshifumi Tanaka, Reflections on Locus Standi in Response to a Breach of Obligations Erga Omnes Partes: A Comparative Analysis of the Whaling in the Antarctic and South China Sea Cases
  • Guillaume Le Floch, Marie Lemey & Lucie Paiola, Procedural Developments at the International Criminal Court (2017)

Workshop: International Investment Law in the Age of Digitalization

The 2019 edition of the Frankfurt Investment Law Workshop will take place on March 8-9 at the Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main. The topic is: "International Investment Law in the Age of Digitalization." The program is here. Attendance is free, but subject to registration. If you are interested in participating, please contact Sabine Schimpf by February 23. 2019.

New Issue: International Organization

The latest issue of International Organization (Vol. 73, no. 1, Winter 2019) is out. Contents include:
  • Articles
    • Nikhil Kalyanpur & Abraham L. Newman, Mobilizing Market Power: Jurisdictional Expansion as Economic Statecraft
    • Phillip Y. Lipscy & Haillie Na-Kyung Lee, The IMF As a Biased Global Insurance Mechanism: Asymmetrical Moral Hazard, Reserve Accumulation, and Financial Crises
    • Darin Christensen, Concession Stands: How Mining Investments Incite Protest in Africa
    • Hanne Fjelde, Lisa Hultman, & Desirée Nilsson, Protection Through Presence: UN Peacekeeping and the Costs of Targeting Civilians
    • Todd C. Lehmann & Yuri M. Zhukov, Until the Bitter End? The Diffusion of Surrender Across Battles
    • Dan Honig, When Reporting Undermines Performance: The Costs of Politically Constrained Organizational Autonomy in Foreign Aid Implementation
  • Research Notes
    • Tamar Mitts, Terrorism and the Rise of Right-Wing Content in Israeli Books
    • Henrikas Bartusevičius & Kristian Skrede Gleditsch, A Two-Stage Approach to Civil Conflict: Contested Incompatibilities and Armed Violence

Thursday, January 24, 2019

Symposium: The Extraterritorial State

On January 25-26, 2019, the Classical Liberal Institute and the Willamette University College of Law will hold a symposium on "The Extraterritorial State." The program is here.

New Issue: Journal of International Criminal Justice

The latest issue of the Journal of International Criminal Justice (Vol. 16, no. 4, September 2018) is out. Contents include:
  • Special Issue: Laying the Foundations for a Convention on Crimes Against Humanity
    • Sean D Murphy, Foreword
    • Leila Nadya Sadat, A Contextual and Historical Analysis of the International Law Commission’s 2017 Draft Articles for a New Global Treaty on Crimes Against Humanity
    • William A Schabas, Prevention of Crimes Against Humanity
    • Elies van Sliedregt, Criminalization of Crimes Against Humanity under National Law
    • Antonio Coco, The Universal Duty to Establish Jurisdiction over, and Investigate, Crimes Against Humanity: Preliminary Remarks on Draft Articles 7, 8, 9 and 11 by the International Law Commission
    • Micaela Frulli, The Draft Articles on Crimes Against Humanity and Immunities of State Officials: Unfinished Business?
    • Harmen van der Wilt, Extradition and Mutual Legal Assistance in the Draft Convention on Crimes Against Humanity
    • Carla Ferstman & Merryl Lawry-White, Participation, Reparation, and Redress: Draft Article 12 of the ILC's Draft Articles on Crimes Against Humanity at the Intersection of International Criminal Law and Human Rights Law
    • Andreas Zimmermann & Felix Boos, Bringing States to Justice for Crimes against Humanity: The Compromissory Clause in the International Law Commission Draft Convention on Crimes against Humanity
    • Hugo A Relva, Three Propositions for a Future Convention on Crimes Against Humanity: The Prohibition of Amnesties, Military Courts, and Reservations
    • Sarah M H Nouwen, Is there Something Missing in the Proposed Convention on Crimes Against Humanity?: A Political Question for States and a Doctrinal One for the International Law Commission
    • Claus Kreß & Sévane Garibian, Laying the Foundations for a Convention on Crimes Against Humanity: Concluding Observations

Petrossian: »Staatenverantwortlichkeit für Völkermord«

Gurgen Petrossian has published »Staatenverantwortlichkeit für Völkermord«: Unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der Ereignisse der Jahre 1915–1923 im Hinblick auf die armenisch-türkischen Beziehungen (Duncker & Humblot 2019). Here's the abstract:
Die Arbeit befasst sich mit der Völkerrechtsanalyse des Völkermordes an den Armeniern und der daraus resultierenden staatlichen Verantwortlichkeit für die Republik Türkei als Nachfolgestaat des Osmanischen Reiches. Die Komplexität der Ereignisse des Völkermordes erfordert die gleichzeitige Beachtung der verschiedenen Rechtsgebiete. Im Mittelpunkt steht neben der Darstellung des Untersuchungsgegenstandes im Vergleich zu ähnlichen historischen Fällen die juristische Analyse des Tatbestandes des Völkermordes und der Rückwirkung der Konvention. Im Anschluss setzt sich der Autor mit den Fragen auseinander, wie die Staatenverantwortlichkeit für die völkerrechtswidrige Handlung vor 100 Jahren sowie eine Wiedergutmachung auf völkerrechtlicher Ebene aussehen könnten.

Loeffler: Zionism, International Law, and the Paradoxes of Hersch Zvi Lauterpacht

James Loeffler (Univ. of Virginia - History) has posted Zionism, International Law, and the Paradoxes of Hersch Zvi Lauterpacht (in The Law of Strangers: Critical Perspectives on Jewish Lawyering and International Legal Thought, forthcoming). Here's the abstract:
The history of modern international law is often told as a fable of Jewish moral cosmopolitanism. Many recent accounts of the lawyer, law professor, and judge Hersch Lauterpacht (1897-1960) confirm this narrative by positing that his pioneering ideas of international human rights, crimes against humanity, and the laws of armed conflict derive from his personal experience of antisemitism, the Holocaust, and refugeedom. Implicitly or explicitly, this meta-narrative frequently situates politics in opposition to law, and frames Zionism as the particularistic pole opposite the putative universalism of twentieth-century Jewish legal cosmopolitanism. This chapter challenges this view through a novel reconstruction of Lauterpacht’s biography based on newly discovered archival sources in English, Hebrew, Yiddish, and Polish. Against the trend towards apolitical or antipolitical narratives, this chapter argues that Lauterpacht’s political investment in the Zionist movement shaped his legal imagination of modern international law.

Wednesday, January 23, 2019

Kassoti: The ECJ and the art of treaty interpretation: Western Sahara Campaign UK

Eva Kassoti (T.M.C. Asser Instituut) has published The ECJ and the art of treaty interpretation: Western Sahara Campaign UK (Common Market Law Review, Vol. 56, no. 1, pp. 209–236, 2019).

Conversation: The International Institutional Lawyer as Scholar and as Practitioner

On March 7, 2019, the T.M.C. Asser Instituut will host, in coordination with the Amsterdam Center for International Law, the Manchester International Law Centre, Oxford International Organizations, and Oxford University Press, a conversation between Niels Blokker and Gabrielle Marceau, hosted by Catherine Brölmann, on "Two Souls in One Breast: The International Institutional Lawyer as Scholar and as Practitioner." A description is here.

Call for Papers: Law: Reactive or Proactive?

A call for papers has been issued for the McGill University's 12th Annual Graduate Law Conference, which will be held in Montreal on May 8-9, 2019. The conference will be held in collaboration with the Dean Maxwell and Isle Cohen Doctoral Seminar Series in International Law. The theme is: "Law: Reactive or Proactive?" This seminar will take the form of a half-day panel discussion on international law topics inspired by the conference theme. The call is here.

Call for Papers: 2019 Global Business and Human Rights Scholars Association Workshop

The Global Business and Human Rights Scholars Association has issued a call for papers for its 2019 annual workshop, which will be held September 12-13, 2019, at the University of Essex. The call is here.

Call for Papers: Procedural Rules of International Courts and Tribunals: Between Change and Stability

A call for papers has been issued for a conference on "Procedural Rules of International Courts and Tribunals: Between Change and Stability," to take place May 3, 2019, in Rome. The call is here.

Call for Engaged Listeners: Protection of the Environment in Relation to Armed Conflict – Beyond the ILC

A call for engaged listeners has been issued for a workshop on "Protection of the Environment in Relation to Armed Conflict – Beyond the ILC," which will take place on March 7-8, 2019, at the Faculty of Law of the University of Hamburg. The call is here.

Call for Papers: Global Un-Governance

A call for papers has been issued for a workshop on "Global Un-Governance," at the University of Edinburgh, on May 23-24, 2019. The call is here.

Tuesday, January 22, 2019

New Volume: German Yearbook of International Law

The latest volume of the German Yearbook of International Law (Vol. 60, 2017) is out. Contents include:
  • Forum: The Relationship between African States and the International Criminal Court
    • Gerhard Werle & Moritz Vormbaum, African States, the African Union, and the International Criminal Court: A Continuing Story
    • Dire Tladi, Of Heroes and Villains, Angels and Demons: The ICC-AU Tension Revisited
  • Focus: International Law and the Dehumanisation of Activities
    • Helmut Philipp Aust, »The System Only Dreams in Total Darkness«: The Future of Human Rights Law in the Light of Algorithmic Authority
    • Thomas Burri, International Law and Artificial Intelligence
    • Aldo Chircop, Testing International Legal Regimes: The Advent of Automated Commercial Vessels
    • Stephan Hobe & Benjamyn I. Scott, International Civil Aviation and the Dehumanisation of Activities
    • Stefan A. Kaiser, Legal Challenges of Automated and Autonomous Systems
    • Nicholas Tsagourias & Russell Buchan, Automatic Cyber Defence and the Laws of War
    • Antje von Ungern-Sternberg, Artifical Agents and General Principles of Law
  • Walther Schücking Lecture
    • Philip Allott, Beyond War and Diplomacy: A Giant Step for Mankind
  • Special Section: Towards Utopia – Rethinking International Law
    • Jens T. Theilen, Isabelle Hassfurther, & Wiebke Staff, Guest Editors’ Introduction: Towards Utopia – Rethinking
    • Jens T. Theilen, Of Wonder and Changing the World: Philip Allott’s Legal Utopianism
    • Ka Lok Yip, What is Human? Reading Social Idealism against the Reality of Blackman and Azaria
    • Radhika Jagtap, Resistance through Utopia: Reflections on the Niyamgiri Anti-Mining Movement and International Law
    • Wiebke Staff, Customary International Law: A Vehicle on the Road from Istopia to Eutopia?
    • Isabelle Hassfurther, Transforming the »International Unsociety«: Towards Eutopia by Means of International Recognition of Peoples’ Representatives
    • Dorothy Makaza, Towards Afrotopia. The AU Withdrawal Strategy Document, the ICC, and the Possibility of Pluralistic Utopias
    • Severin Meier, The Influence of Utopian Projects on the Interpretation of International Law and the Healthy Myth of Objectivity
    • Marnie Lloydd, Persistent Tensions? International Legal Perspectives on ›Other‹ Foreign Fighters
    • Michelle Staggs Kelsall, From a Stark Utopia to Everyday Utopias
    • Rossana Deplano, Building Pragmatic Utopias: The »Other« Security Council, International Law, and the United Nations Dream
  • General Articles
    • Peter Lawrence & Lukas Köhler, Representation of Future Generations through International Climate Litigation: A Normative Framework
    • Anja Seibert-Fohr, From Complicity to Due Diligence: When Do States Incur Responsibility for Their Involvement in Serious International Wrongdoing?
  • German Practice
    • Avril Rushe, Same-Sex Marriage under the Grundgesetz and the European Convention on Human Rights
    • Isabelle Hassfurther, Will There Be »Justice for Syria«? The Assad Regime in German Courts
    • Felix Würkert, The German Past between Collectives and Individuals
    • Tobias Thienel, Application and Repeal of the Offence of Insulting Foreign Heads of State: The Böhmermann Affair
    • Alena Kunstreich, Prohibition or Non-Proliferation? Germany’s Point of View Concerning the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons and Effective Nuclear Arms Control and Disarmament
    • Markus Gentzsch & Marc Becker, PSPP – Curtain Up for a New Act in the Drama »German Federal Constitutional Court versus European Court of Justice«

Call for Papers: Conference on "Military Assistance on Request"

On December 5-6, 2019, the Journal on the Use of Force and International Law and the Ghent Rolin-Jaequemyns International Law Institute will host a conference focusing on "Military Assistance on Request." The call for papers is here.

Monday, January 21, 2019

New Additions to the UN Audiovisual Library of International Law

The Codification Division of the UN Office of Legal Affairs recently added two lectures to the UN Audiovisual Library of International Law. They were given by María Teresa Infante Caffi on “Antártica ante el Derecho Internacional” and Leila Nadya Sadat on “Interpreting the Statute of the International Criminal Court.”

New Issue: Humanity

The latest issue of Humanity (Vol. 9, no. 3, Winter 2018) is out. Contents include:
  • Jessica Whyte, The "Dangerous Concept of the Just War": Decolonization, Wars of National Liberation, and the Additional Protocols to the Geneva Conventions
  • Megan Cole Paustian, A Postcolonial Theory of Universal Humanity: Bessie Head's Ethics of the Margins
  • Golnar Nikpour, Claiming Human Rights: Iranian Political Prisoners and the Making of a Transnational Movement, 1963–1979
  • Christy Thornton, A Mexican International Economic Order? Tracing the Hidden Roots of the Charter of Economic Rights and Duties of States
  • A. Naomi Paik, Representing the Disappeared Body: Videos of Force-Feedings at Guantánamo
  • Dossier on Asylum/Home
    • Michal Heiman, A New Community of Women 1855–2019
    • Michal Heiman, Return: Asylum (The Dress, 1855–2019)
    • Orna Ben-Naftali, The Asylum and its Discontents: Reflections on Michal Heiman
    • Sharon Sliwinski, The Woman Who Walks Through Photographs
  • Edward B. Rackley, Dictates of Conscience in the Humanitarian System

Conference: Who is Afraid of the International Criminal Court?

On January 24-25, 2019, iCourts will hold a conference on "Who is Afraid of the International Criminal Court?" The program is here.

Symposium: International Organizations and Decolonization in Historical Perspective

On January 25-26, 2019, a symposium on "International Organizations and Decolonization in Historical Perspective" will be held in Berlin. The program is here.

New Issue: Revue Générale de Droit International Public

The latest issue of the Revue Générale de Droit International Public (Vol. 122, no. 4, 2018) is out. Contents include:
  • Articles
    • Hervé Ascensio & Beatrice I. Bonafé, L’absence d’immunité des agents de l’Etat en cas de crime international: pourquoi en débattre encore?
    • Eric Wyler, La déclaration d’indépendance de la Catagne: sécession, non ingérences et (non-) reconnaissance
    • Laurence Dubin, RSE et droit des investissements, les prémisses d’une rencontré
    • Florian Couveinhes Matsumoto, Le lancement de la négociation d’une convention instituant une cour multilatérale d’investissements : l’avenir indéterminé d’un projet européen déterminant